C. affinis - Page 9 - Cryptocorynes - Aquatic Plant Central

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Cryptocorynes Cryptocoryne plant species consists of 50+ plant species, and make a unique addition to a planted tank.

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Old 10-24-2013, 04:53 AM   #81 (permalink)
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Default Re: C. affinis

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Originally Posted by illustrator View Post
Besides Crypts I also grow African violets, especially the wild species. Violets in general trade are all cultivars and are easy to distinguish from wild ones by looking at a few characters. In fact, there are several thousand cultivars registered, of which at least several hundred circulate amongst growers. Of all these, only a very small handfull of cultivars resembles the wild species to such an extend that they could be confused with them. Even with all those cultivars around, the way to obtain the original wild plants remains the same: from one grower to another (or also from one botanical garden to another).

I am not so worried about added confusion, our current situation is more like that most Crypts in circulation are of unknown (but probably wild) origin and also now practically the only way to obtain plands from known origin is from other serious growers (unless you count obtaining them directly from the wild).

In case of C. affinis I think that we can be pretty sure that all are of wild origin, but only from some very serious growers you can get plants of known origin. Also of the original "hearteliana" the exact origin is unknown, although we know that it was imported to Germany by Härtel around 1939.

So the best and only thing we can do, is to have a small notebook in which we write down as much as we know about the origin of our plants. When we give our plants on to someone else, we just copy these notes and thus try to preserve the information with the plants.
I will update the page Page with a litle of my knowledge about hybrids and clones I already got from some experience growers from here in Costa Rica I got 2 species of Pontideriifolia one is a natural hybrid like the the C. Crispatula var balansae that is a natural hybrid. And the other one is a clone. Different leaf color.

Best regards
Ron Kalman
Costa Rica.
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Old 10-27-2013, 02:07 PM   #82 (permalink)
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Default Re: C. affinis

Hello Ron,

Please be careful when applying (botanical) termini with defined meaning - I have problems to understand what you're trying to get across?


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from some experience growers from here in Costa Rica I got 2 species of Pontideriifolia one is a natural hybrid
C. pontederiifolia is a single species (with several known collecting localities) and is not of hybrid origin; there is only a single widely distributed strain that is available commercially.


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And the other one is a clone. Different leaf color.
Do you mean a sport from a known strain/locality/clone?


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like the the C. Crispatula var balansae that is a natural hybrid.
Well, the evolutionary biology of C. crispatula var. balansae is a pet peeve of mine and IMHO certainly interesting and far from sufficiently studied. However, it's pretty clear that it's not a mere hybrid. Where did you got that notion?
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Old 10-27-2013, 02:43 PM   #83 (permalink)
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Default Re: C. affinis

Hello Paul,

Quote:
Besides Crypts I also grow African violets, especially the wild species. Violets in general trade are all cultivars and are easy to distinguish from wild ones by looking at a few characters. In fact, there are several thousand cultivars registered, of which at least several hundred circulate amongst growers. Of all these, only a very small handfull of cultivars resembles the wild species to such an extend that they could be confused with them. Even with all those cultivars around, the way to obtain the original wild plants remains the same: from one grower to another (or also from one botanical garden to another).
Yes, a reliable provenance is paramount for getting the "correct" plants.

With crypts the problem of recognizing cultivars and artificial hybrids from wild strains could well be greater though since there are already a huge bunch of natural hybrids while most artificial hybrids are not that distinct from wild crypts (African violets have mainly be cultivated in horticulture for showy flowers which are usually very obvious while leaves of crypts tend to be very variable to begin with...).


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I am not so worried about added confusion, our current situation is more like that most Crypts in circulation are of unknown (but probably wild) origin and also now practically the only way to obtain plands from known origin is from other serious growers (unless you count obtaining them directly from the wild).
In the ECS it's pretty much the other way around with most stocks having a known collecting locality or otherwise unique identity (historic type strains, etc.). Undocumented hybrids popping up in the commercial trade would certainly be of concern (even if not affecting the collections of insiders).


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In case of C. affinis I think that we can be pretty sure that all are of wild origin, but only from some very serious growers you can get plants of known origin. Also of the original "hearteliana" the exact origin is unknown, although we know that it was imported to Germany by Härtel around 1939.
Yes, I agree that we should try to maintain these old aquarium stocks, too. Despite their unknown origin, they do represent a part of the diversity of the species and, considering what is happening in their natural habitats, it is quite possible that some of these populations are already extinct in nature...


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So the best and only thing we can do, is to have a small notebook in which we write down as much as we know about the origin of our plants. When we give our plants on to someone else, we just copy these notes and thus try to preserve the information with the plants.
Yes, that's the way it goes. It doesn't hurt to add unique collection numbers - these often tend to "survive" and keep traveling together with a known strain (rather than lengthy notes - efforts that should be published in dedicated journals like Aqua Planta, etc.).
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Old 10-27-2013, 02:55 PM   #84 (permalink)
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Default Re: C. affinis

Hello Ron,

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Originally Posted by Plant Freak View Post
I got 4 varieties of C. Affinis the old variety with the big long leafs know as haertiliana on the 50. 2 hybrid affinis and a brown variety. There is 3 more that I am trying get a big black one and 2 green. For my collection. I will like to hybrid two the old with a black for size and colors and complete a small experiment if it works. Where can I find good info on that.?? To hybrid crypts.
I'm going to post some details/tips in the near future. I'm not sure if affinis is the most rewarding species for making intraspecific crosses but please do keep us posted how things work out!

I guess affinis will do well in an outdoor setting. However, please make sure nothing escapes into local streams!
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Old 09-26-2016, 07:26 AM   #85 (permalink)
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Default Re: What's your Favorite Cryptocoryne?

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Woah, I would LOVE to have any Affinis, but especially the C. Affinis 'old' LOL
Hi I love the weath of info on this page, The C.affinis "old" kinda sounds and looks like what Dennerle has on offer, the submersed form is a real beauty.
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Old 10-09-2016, 10:26 AM   #86 (permalink)
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Default Re: What's your Favorite Cryptocoryne?

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Originally Posted by hoodie75 View Post
Hi I love the weath of info on this page, The C.affinis "old" kinda sounds and looks like what Dennerle has on offer, the submersed form is a real beauty.
A friend told me that Dennerle's "affinis" is a wendtii form. I haven't yet seen its inflorescences, at least its long-stalked green emersed leaves don't look like affinis at all but like those of a Sri Lanka Crypt. However, its submerged red-brown leaves with light veins look really beautiful, and I wonder if it's the wendtii form that was once described by Rataj as C. wendtii var. rubella.
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