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Old 07-19-2006, 10:53 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Aeration and CO2

Hi Everyone,

I have an 86 gallon tank which I am replanting. I am getting my new light tonight - a Coralight 4 x 65 FW 48". What I can't afford yet is CO2. I run a wall of bubbles in the background (helps keep down algae and looks really mesmerizing). When I DO put CO2 in, how will the aeration affect the dispersal of CO2 in the tank? Will I have to shut the aeration off during the day when the CO2 will be used?

By the way, I'm running a Fluval 404 & 304 on this tank with one spray bar so there is lots of current.

Also, until I can afford a pressurized system, will the DIY type help at least a little if it is a DIY for say a 55 gallon tank (or if you run two of these)?

Thanks,

KLT
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Old 07-19-2006, 11:18 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Hmm an 86 gallon tank seems an odd size for a tank. But anyways.

You're right, the bubble bar should be turned off when CO2 is injected during the day. You want to minimize the outgasing of CO2 and the surface aggitation that causes this degasing.

DIY CO2 for that size tank can be pretty difficult and time consuming. But I've seen people try it until they get something else. You can purchase 2 Hagen ladders from drsfostersmith.com and attach each ladder to (2) 2 liter bottles with a T-valve. Run each ladder on each side of the tank.

Though potentially pricey, you could purchase Flourish Excel and use that as a CO2 supplement for awhile, but using this product on such a large tank is not very cost effective after a few months.

Depending on your plant selection you can reduce your lighting by using only 2 of your bulbs until you can afford a pressurized setup too.

More light = more algae if insufficient CO2 and fertilization is added.

-John N.
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Old 07-19-2006, 09:18 PM   #3 (permalink)
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If you have an open top tank, I would turn the bubble wall off during the day and on at night.

If you have a closed top tank, I would run the bubble wall constantly.

As long as you have good flow in the tank, you will have to turn your CO2 up to compensate, but not by much. I run very strong aeration in my covered tank 24/7 and I only had to turn the CO2 up a little bit to compensate.

I believe airstones are important in covered tanks in order to keep dissolved oxygen high, especially if you have a fully stocked tank or fish which are heavy oxygen breathers.

This is my personal belief, and I've gotten in a lot of trouble over it in the past. But since it's something I took the time to test myself, I've already drawn my own conclusions and cannot think otherwise.
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Old 07-20-2006, 03:50 AM   #4 (permalink)
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I agree with John about your lighting. If you're planning on using all 4 x 65W bulbs, you need CO2 in there, or you'll soon have an algae farm.

Quote:
This is my personal belief, and I've gotten in a lot of trouble over it in the past. But since it's something I took the time to test myself, I've already drawn my own conclusions and cannot think otherwise.
Salt, sometimes you have to challenge the established beliefs to get to some new realities. It's like the thread elsewhere here dealing with injecting CO2 into a 0kh tank. If you do it, and have the evidence that it works, that's what matters.
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Old 07-20-2006, 06:45 AM   #5 (permalink)
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With a big tank like that, I'd suggest going for the pressurized CO2 as soon as possible too. Here's a good price on the stuff. It's a reef store, but they have some FW stuff and the best prices in Canada on lighting (that I've found.)
http://www.jlaquatics.com/phpstore/s...ID=cr-ppmilreg

You can get a CO2 cylinder form Praxair, Air Liquide, or any place that supplies welding gases.
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Old 07-20-2006, 01:46 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Salt
...
I believe airstones are important in covered tanks in order to keep dissolved oxygen high, especially if you have a fully stocked tank or fish which are heavy oxygen breathers.

...
And/or if you have a tank with low surface area in relation to tank volume, such as some hex tanks or tall narrow tanks.

Personally, I've never used aerators, bubble walls etc because I'd rather not have a tank; but that's a personal esthetic opinion...

I've had closed top tanks for about 20 years until a couple of years ago when I started with open top tanks; I never had an issue with lack of O2 etc. I even had closed top tanks without airpumps way before I got into planted tanks.

On the other hand, I never overstocked tanks (except when I was first starting out ) and I never had a tank with a surface area/volume ratio that was not at least close to a "standard" rectangular tank.
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