Anubias barteri 'Tommy White' - Page 3 - New Plants for Planted Aquariums - Aquatic Plant Central

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New Plants for Planted Aquariums As everything else in this world evolves, so does the hobby of planted aquariums. This is the forum to discuss new plants for planted aquariums. How to introduce these new plants and the best environments for them to survive.

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Old 02-16-2008, 11:57 AM   #21 (permalink)
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Default Re: Anubias barteri 'Tommy White'

Im sure Rob knows what hes talking about here. I just talked to tom barr about this plant and he pretty much said what rob said. its a prorogation from an anubias marble plant that grew completely white leaves. He said low light and low nitrates keep it white or else it starts to turn green and he also said because of its while color it grows painfully slow becuase apparently there is a lack of chlorophyll in the white leaves. even new leaves on anubias plants like coffeefolia are yellowish not bright white like the picture rob posted
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Old 04-03-2008, 06:52 PM   #22 (permalink)
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Default Re: Anubias barteri 'Tommy White'

Its another variegated form of the anubias. Instead of the mutation of variegation being marbled (Splashed variegate) the non functioning cells (no chlrophyll) are scattered in smaller portions throughout the leaves. You will notice that as the leaves of this form of variegate age, they will start to turn to a lighter green-these will then make more food (sugar) for the plant to live. This type of variegated pattern is called a "Ghost".
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Old 04-03-2008, 07:12 PM   #23 (permalink)
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Default Re: Anubias barteri 'Tommy White'

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Its another variegated form of the anubias. Instead of the mutation of variegation being marbled (Splashed variegate) the non functioning cells (no chlrophyll) are scattered in smaller portions throughout the leaves. You will notice that as the leaves of this form of variegate age, they will start to turn to a lighter green-these will then make more food (sugar) for the plant to live. This type of variegated pattern is called a "Ghost".
actually tom told me low nitrates and low light keep this anubias bright white. ive seen it for myself at toms house and becuase of this the plant is a terribly slow grower
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Old 04-03-2008, 07:32 PM   #24 (permalink)
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Default Re: Anubias barteri 'Tommy White'

Additional info: It is possible to find variegated forms of ANY plant. This is a natural mutation. Asians have been collecting variegated plants for thousands of years and consider them to be national treasures. Variegation can also be produced with chemicals and from a natural virus. The majority are "sports" and are somatic variegates (not stable & will not produce variegated plants from seed). There are genetic variegates, and these will produce variegated seedlings and are stable clones of the parent. There are about 15 recognized variegated leaf patterns. These are illustrated in "Variegated Plants in Color" Vol 1 by Yoshimichi Hirose & Masato Yokoi. These anubias are all somatic variegates, thus they have a tendency to revert back to normal green unless the individual plant has an over abundance of mutant tissue. They will perform best in higher light conditions as some of the tissue does not contain chlorophyll and will not produce food. These non-functioning portions are sustained from the functioning portions. Variegates will grow much slower than their normal green counterparts because of this. Variegation can also be seen in yellow/green (aurea variegata) and all yellow (aurea) forms. I have seen only 4 variegated forms of Anubias available; A.Barteri "Marbled"-this is the "splashed" form with green and white "mosaic" patterns-(Erroneously tagged as the more white form), A. Barteri "Ghost"-this is the more all white form tagged as "Tommy White" & "Marbled"-(and you will notice that the older leaves will eventually fade to green which is the reason that this form can survive as the older leaves will function to produce food), A. Barteri "Gold", and A. Lanceolata "Marbled".
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Old 04-03-2008, 07:40 PM   #25 (permalink)
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Default Re: Anubias barteri 'Tommy White'

Nitrates, fertilizers, amt of light, etc. have very little to do with a mutation that causes cells not to have chlorophyll in them. The patterns are caused by the way in which the 3 main layers of tissue emerge as they swirl around the apical meristem as the new growth is produced. I have all of these in my aquatic collection and the separate forms can have varying degrees of "variegation" and each will produce different looking leaves from plant to plant. Very high light, or very low light will affect the brightness somewhat, but will not change the amount of variegation each plant will produce. Of course, you could "burn out" any remaining color with over fertilizing, but this is true for any plant.
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Old 04-04-2008, 03:04 AM   #26 (permalink)
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Default Re: Anubias barteri 'Tommy White'

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Nitrates, fertilizers, amt of light, etc. have very little to do with a mutation that causes cells not to have chlorophyll in them.
Im not talking about mutating a plant via fertilization you cannot create a mutant srtain just through fertilization mutant strains are natural genetic phenomenons that occur in nature what tom did was find a plant that was mutated to a very big extreme via natural causes and then introduced ideal conditions to bring out the bright white of the natural coloration of the plant.

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These anubias are all somatic variegates, thus they have a tendency to revert back to normal green unless the individual plant has an over abundance of mutant tissue.
thats exactly what a tommy white an utter abundance of mutant tissue once a plant is mutated via variegated white forms you cannot change this you can only enhance or destroy the amount of white it receives via light and fertilizers if you provide more light and nitrates you subsequently provide more food for chlorophyll (green) to grow in the plant if you reduce the amount then less will grow providing adverse effects even old leaves have the ability to stay completely white I have seen toms plant with my very own eyes and it is completely white even the older leaves even given good light from what ive experienced aged leaves of white variants of anubias strains turn yellow not white.

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the tissue does not contain chlorophyll and will not produce food.
even an anubias that is pure white has the ability to sustain itself and produce food via its roots and or water column fertilization however as noted before because of its lack of cholorphyl in the plant tissue grows at a painfully slow rate, which subsequently makes its nutrient consumption EXTREMELY low
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Old 04-04-2008, 12:43 PM   #27 (permalink)
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Default Re: Anubias barteri 'Tommy White'

Sorry to be a nit-picker about variegates, but Ive been an avid collector of rare variegated plants for about 20 years now. I have a huge collection upwards of 400 species and cultivars, about 20 aquatic or marginal. Ive investigated & studied this for quite some time, I propagate and sell rare variegates to Botanical Gardens and private collectors all over the world. (http://www.raretropicalplants.com) I'm not quite sure I understand what you mean by "mutating a plant via fertilization"? As far as I know you can't create a mutation simply by the process of fertilization. Although, you can hybridize a genetic variegate with a normal green plant and get a small percentage of variegated plants from seed (if you are crossing seeded varieties of plants). Variegation in plants is very similar to albinism in animals-you can't change the amount of coloration exhibited in an albino, or a partial albino, by food or light or any other outside condition. The individual plant he obtained has an over abundance of mutant tissue and this is the reason this particular plant is highly variegated, i.e., somatic variegated plants differ from plant to plant as to the amount of mutant tissue each has. The more variegation (mutant non functioning cells) the particular plant has, the slower it will grow. There are poorly marked variegates and highly marked variegates, and everything in between. All "Tommy White" Anubias will not look the same, (BTY, I also have a bee in my bonnet about these tacked on IDs for plants by private individuals or commercial distributors; these are not correct Latin descriptives and lead to a lot of nomenclature confusion). The plant is correctly identified as Anubias barteri albo variegata cv. "Ghost", or, Anubias Barteri albo variegata cv. "Marble")-they will vary from individual plant to plant because they are not genetic variegates (identical clones of the Mother plant). "even an anubias that is pure white has the ability to sustain itself and produce food via its roots and or water column fertilization however as noted before because of its lack of cholorphyl in the plant tissue grows at a painfully slow rate, which subsequently makes its nutrient consumption EXTREMELY low" -This simply is not true; again, light and fertilizers will not affect the amount of chlorophyll present in cells of the plant that simply do not contain chlorophyll. That is the nature of the mutation itself. You cannot keep an all white plant alive that does not contain any chlorophyll via food taken up by root transfer. Completely white plants with no chlorophyll are called etiolates, and will always die fairly quickly after exhausting whatever food is transported through the roots and vascular system. They are simply just too weak. "if you provide more light and nitrates you subsequently provide more food for chlorophyll (green) to grow in the plant"-More amounts of chlorophyll will not grow in the plant; the food is used by the existing chlorophyll to feed the portions (white) which do not have chlorophyll. The green portions support the mutant white portions, this is why the plants grow slower.It is a strain on the plant to support the non functioning portions. If this were true, then simply by providing more nutrients to the plant, it would then revert back to normal green without any white coloration-and they dont. Concerning the amount of light needed for optimum growth in highly variegated plants, it is only reasonable that if you have a plant that has very little chlorophyll, the more light you give it, the more food it can produce to support itself. Lower light will only slow the growth further. In terrestrial variegated plants, if you put them in full sun, the variegated portions will brown out and die, but the plant itself is stronger. It doesnt look as pretty, but it is healthier. In an aquarium, the light produced is not as strong and usually will not burn out the white portions. I have one variegated anubias growing on driftwood 3" from the water surface which exhibits bright white leaves. I have another planted on rock at the soil line (14" from the surface) and the leaves are more light green-(these came from the same original plant via division). Older leaves in the Marbled type and the Ghost type (Tommy White) will turn yellow as they age and die as in normal green plants. The difference is that in order for this Ghost type variegation patterned plant to live is that the leaves do fade to green as they age and this is why the plant can support the newer white leaves. They are turning yellow because they are old, not because of the particular amount of variegation the leaf exhibits. If you take a look at the older "white" leaves with a magnifying lens, you will see very tiny green speckles, as the leaf ages these expand and help to feed the plant, turning these leaves progressively darker in color.
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Old 04-04-2008, 04:28 PM   #28 (permalink)
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Default Re: Anubias barteri 'Tommy White'

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Jazz, did Tom ever admit to you he made up the name tommy white?
no he said someone at oriental named it after him, who i do not know
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Old 04-04-2008, 11:08 PM   #29 (permalink)
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Default Re: Anubias barteri 'Tommy White'

BTY Here are 2 links for a commercial distributor and a grower who sell variegated anubias, one in Thailand , the other in NY. Also aquaticmagic sells another form in Singapore. Different to the one offered by OA. Oriental Aquarium lists online only one form that I can see (Anubias nana "variegated"). There are many other variegated forms out there. These are the ones I found without too much searching:Cofeefolia, lanceolata, barteri, and 'minima'.
www.ewaterplant.com/plant/a5.htm www.pets-warehouse.com/AquariumPlants.htm
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Old 04-05-2008, 02:45 AM   #30 (permalink)
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Default Re: Anubias barteri 'Tommy White'

I removed Robert's post from this thread. It unnecessarily derailed the conversation.

Varig8 - interesting stuff. If I could offer one suggestion. Could you please use paragraphs? It's really hard to read so much without some sort of separation.
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