[Wet Thumb Forum]-BAR and PSI - DIY Aquarium Projects - Aquatic Plant Central

Go Back   Aquatic Plant Central > General Interest Forums > DIY Aquarium Projects

DIY Aquarium Projects For those that are handy or looking to save some money, discuss your DIY aquarium projects here.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-13-2003, 02:37 AM   #1 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 0
iTrader Ratings: 0
Corey is a regular member
Default

Does anyone know how to convert BAR to psi? Thanks.
Corey is offline   Reply With Quote

Advertisement [Remove Advertisement]
Old 08-13-2003, 02:37 AM   #2 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 0
iTrader Ratings: 0
Corey is a regular member
Default

Does anyone know how to convert BAR to psi? Thanks.
Corey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2003, 03:11 AM   #3 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 52
iTrader Ratings: 0
Jim Miller is a regular member
Default

1 BAR is approximately equal to sealevel typical air pressure of 30mm of mercury, 30ft of water and 14.7psi.

The 30ft of water is sometimes useful since it means that each foot of water column in the tank is about 0.5psi.

have fun

jtm
Jim Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 08-13-2003, 03:59 PM   #4 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 0
iTrader Ratings: 0
gsmollin is a regular member
Default

One bar is the pressure of 1 million dynes per square centimeter.

The pressure of one atmosphere is 1,013,000 dynes/square centimeter, which converts to 14.696 psi. The mercury-column barometer reads 760 mm in height at one atmosphere of pressure. A water depth of 33.91 feet has a pressure of one atmosphere (14.696 psi.) Each aded 33.91 feet of water depth adds another atmosphere.
gsmollin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2003, 02:23 AM   #5 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 0
iTrader Ratings: 0
Corey is a regular member
Default

Thanks that clears it up....I think.
Corey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2003, 04:04 AM   #6 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 0
iTrader Ratings: 0
gsmollin is a regular member
Default

...you think? It should be perfectly clear. Maybe you are having trouble with your metic units. A dyne is the unit of force in the cgs (centimeter-gram-second) metric system. A mass of one gram, at rest at sea level, experiences a gravitation field of 980 cm/sec squared. The force on the one gram mass is therefore 980 gram-cm/sec squared. A gram-cm/second squared is a dyne, so the weight of one gram is 980 dynes. A cubic centimeter of water has a mass of 1 gram, and a weight of 980 dynes. If we had a column of water 1 cm on a side, that was 102 cm high, it would weigh 1,000,000 dynes, and the water pressure at the bottom of the water column would be 1,000,000 dynes/sq centimeter, or one bar. That is almost one atmosphere, which is 1.013 bar.

OBTW, a lot of the confusion revolves around the British engineering system's use of the pound as both a unit of force and a unit of mass. A mass of one pound weighs one pound. These two units are actually called pound-mass (lbm.) and pound-force (lbf.) To convert one lbm. to .lbf, multiply by 32.2 feet/sec. squared.

Metric doesn't do this, in the standard system, (SI) the unit of mass is the kilogram, and the unit of force is the Newton. One kilogram weighs 9.8 Newtons. One gram weighs 980 dynes. One pound weighs 1 pound. Clear now?
gsmollin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2003, 04:42 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 0
iTrader Ratings: 0
Corey is a regular member
Default

Yeah I got it I'm just wondering where the heck you got it. I've never even heard of a dyne. Must been asleep that day in class. What sorta job do you have that you know all this? Just curious.
Corey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2003, 11:25 AM   #8 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 0
iTrader Ratings: 0
gsmollin is a regular member
Default

By training and career I'm an electrical engineer. However, most of this is freshman physics, so any math major would know as much- assuming they didn't sleep through the lecture. My familiarity with British Engineering System is through one thermodynamics course of many years ago, and that is one convoluted system of units. Metric (SI) is a much easier system, although it's French, and of course we don't approve of them these days.
gsmollin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2003, 01:10 PM   #9 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 0
iTrader Ratings: 0
JamesHoftiezer is a regular member
Default

I'm also an electical engineer but slpet through those classes. I then switched to databases.....

James Hoftiezer
Hoftiezer.Net - Journals and Libraries
Tank Journal - Aquascape ( Latest / Archive )
Tank Journal - Parts and Construction ( Latest / Archive )

JamesHoftiezer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2003, 04:49 AM   #10 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 0
iTrader Ratings: 0
Corey is a regular member
Default

Guess that explains it. I was a history major.
Corey is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Aquatic Plant Central > General Interest Forums > DIY Aquarium Projects > [Wet Thumb Forum]-BAR and PSI

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 08:25 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1