Post your local water quality - Fertilizing - Aquatic Plant Central

Go Back   Aquatic Plant Central > Special Interest Forums > Fertilizing

Fertilizing Science of Aquatic Fertilizing - Discuss fertilizing techniques and proper aquatic plant nutrition here.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-02-2004, 03:27 PM   #1 (permalink)
Member of SCAPE
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: San Juan Capistrano, CA
Posts: 882
iTrader Ratings: 3
iTrader Positive Rating: 100%
IUnknown is a regular member
Default Post your local water quality

As the basis of any fertilizer routine, one needs to know what is in the water that is supplied to them. A quick email or phone call to your local water company can get you all the information you need. You may need to ask for a Water Quality Specialist for the detailed info. Also ask about your water source for your address.

San Jose, CA Local water quality (Lawrence expressway and 280)
9.2.04
San Jose Water Quality Report


A quick email to my water company revealed,
Water Source - Summer = 25% Well 75% Import
Water Source - Winter = 60% Well 40% Import
From the report,




example of how I calculated totals,
(25 % X 30+ (75 % X 104)=155

Spreadsheet to help fill out information,
http://www.aquascapingjournals.com/f...lityreport.xls

Last edited by Edward; 01-17-2005 at 10:59 AM..
IUnknown is offline   Reply With Quote

Advertisement [Remove Advertisement]
Old 11-12-2004, 11:04 AM   #2 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Brooklyn, New York
Posts: 1,035
iTrader Ratings: 3
iTrader Positive Rating: 100%
pineapple is a regular member
Default

New York City (5 boroughs) water is detailed in a report at the following location:

http://www.ci.nyc.ny.us/html/dep/html/wsstate.html

Summarized as:


*90% of New York City water (and for surrounding areas) comes from the Catskill Delaware system of resevoirs.

Andrew Cribb
pineapple is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2004, 09:33 PM   #3 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
magicmagni's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 199
iTrader Ratings: 0
magicmagni is a regular member
Default

Thanks for the post. It motivated to do some diggin on the net and I found that the towns in my area have water quality reports online in PDF form. Can't get any easier than that!!

Milbrae, CA:

http://www.ci.millbrae.ca.us/pdf/waterquality2002.pdf

Pacifica, CA:

http://www.nccwd.com/2003%20CCR%20BA...ble%20ver1.pdf

San Bruno, CA:

http://sanbruno.ca.gov/city_services...PW_CCR2004.pdf
magicmagni is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 11-20-2004, 10:22 AM   #4 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
JLudwig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: University of Delaware
Posts: 201
iTrader Ratings: 0
JLudwig is a regular member
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pineapple
New York City (5 boroughs) water is detailed in a report at the following location:
Holy phosphates batman... I think I have something very similar going on down here, do you notice oddball pH problems with so much phosphate? My water, if you let it sit, measures of pH of 6.6, I inject CO2 down to 5.4 or so but the tables have been pretty useless to me...

Also my local water reports usually don't include phosphate or Ca/Mg breakdown, do they need to legally provide this? I'm even willing to send some water away for a water report but I can't seem to find any labs that will do this...?

Jeff
JLudwig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2004, 10:33 AM   #5 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Gomer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: In the desert
Posts: 2,330
iTrader Ratings: 5
iTrader Positive Rating: 100%
Gomer is a regular member
Default

Hey Jeff,

this might interest you (scroll down to water)

http://www.ag.mdsharris.com/test_pac.../test_pack.asp


Not cheap...but an option
Gomer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2004, 10:49 AM   #6 (permalink)
cS
Senior Member
 
cS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 426
iTrader Ratings: 1
iTrader Positive Rating: 100%
cS is a regular member
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JLudwig
Also my local water reports usually don't include phosphate or Ca/Mg breakdown, do they need to legally provide this? I'm even willing to send some water away for a water report but I can't seem to find any labs that will do this...?
Jeff, the water report provided by your water company online or sent to you yearly is, more often than not, a very crude piece of document, lacking a lot of information planted tank folks want to know. Find the number for your water company which should be on the utility bill. Call and request for a COMPREHENSIVE water report. They will transfer you to the testing department where someone will take down your address. In 1-2 weeks, you'll get a 3-6-page report detailing all sorts of chemical breakdowns than you'll know what to do with. All the stuff we care about is usually in the first two pages.

Whatever they don't test for, you can request it. I am not sure if they are legally bound to oblige, but if you are anywhere near a big city where taxes are a-plenty then you'll have a little bit more leverage.

All this is free by the way.
cS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2004, 03:26 PM   #7 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 432
iTrader Ratings: 0
TWood is a regular member
Default

For Austin, Texas

http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/water/downloads/wqs_3q04.pdf

That 9.8 pH out of the tap floored me when I first started caring about the water. Let it sit out a while and it drops to about 7.6 as it takes on CO2 from the atmosphere. One ppm of PO4 is nice for plants, but the reef folks here don't like it.

TW
TWood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2004, 07:08 PM   #8 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
HeyPK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Soggy Central Mississippi
Posts: 4,696
iTrader Ratings: 25
iTrader Positive Rating: 100%
HeyPK is a valuable member of the community HeyPK is a valuable member of the community HeyPK is a valuable member of the community
Default

When the water comes out of the tap with a higher pH than it has upon standing, it probably means that the water company has dosed it with lime (Calcium hydroxide) to reduce how much it dissolves the pipes. When I was in Boston, in the late 60's they got their water from granite reservoirs and didn't add any lime. The pH out of the tap was around 6, and there was 5 ppm of copper, enough to be lethal for most tank inhabitants.

In central Mississippi, the water comes out of the tap with a pH of 8.3 and it rises to about 8.6 upon standing. This is due to a large amount of sodium bicarbonate in the water and almost nothing else. With my test kits, Ca, Mg, K, and PO4 are zero. All that sodium bicarbonate is not good for much, and it slows down the uptake of badly needed calcium into the water from limestone or snail shells. I prefer to work with rain water. Fortunately, it rains a lot here.
HeyPK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2004, 05:21 AM   #9 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Brooklyn, New York
Posts: 1,035
iTrader Ratings: 3
iTrader Positive Rating: 100%
pineapple is a regular member
Default

I often wondered if there would be a potential algae problem from using rain water. Usually, people collect rain water as run off from a roof and collect it in a plastic barrel. There must be the potential for quite a lot of algae 'spores' to accumulate in that water. How do you treat it?

Andrew Cribb
pineapple is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2004, 04:46 PM   #10 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 32
iTrader Ratings: 0
trc_pdx is a regular member
Default

Portland, OR

TDS = 29 ppm
Hardness (as CaCO3) = 7.9 ppm
Alkalinity (as CaCO3) = 12 ppm

Now that's soft water!

See http://www.portlandonline.com/shared...e.cfm?id=33093 (PDF) for the complete report.

pH is 7.9. The city adds "sodium hydroxide to increase the pH of the water to reduce corrosion of plumbing systems. This treatment helps control lead and copper levels at customers’ taps should these metals be present in the customers’ home plumbing."

Portland's primary water supply comes from the Bull Run Reserve, a forested watershed near Mt. Hood. The city occassionally mixes groundwater from several well fields when Bull Run supplies are low or are too turbid. The well water adds some hardness but not much. Much more info can be found at www.portlandonline.com/water.

Tim
trc_pdx is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Aquatic Plant Central > Special Interest Forums > Fertilizing > Post your local water quality

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Aquatic Plant Forum Replies Last Post
soft, rain water questions Aqua5-0 Fertilizing 7 08-07-2005 02:32 AM
Been enjoying the local water (56k warning) neonfish3 Local Biotopes 7 05-30-2004 10:10 AM
Water Changer cS DIY Aquarium Projects 10 04-21-2004 08:27 PM
Automatic Water Changing bobo Equipment 6 02-21-2004 04:31 AM
Substrate solution/water column interaction MiamiAG Substrates 5 02-08-2004 10:24 AM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 08:08 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1