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Nano Aquariums Nanos aquariums may be small but they can make a striking canvas for your aquascapes.

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Old 07-19-2005, 07:53 PM   #11 (permalink)
 
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Hi, Paul! I believe I had this plant, too. It was called something like E. parviflorus var. 'Peruensis' or something of the sort. Maybe it was just E. peruensis. It's a beautiful plant with these really neat sort of darkened veins along a long, somewhat-slender lanceolate leaf. I loved it and it was growing well for me, but unfortunately, "growing well" meant "taking over" my 2.5-gallon tank. I think I ended up giving it all back to the LFS. It was similar in a lot of ways to E. quadricostatus, which also proved to be too big and invasive for my 2.5-gallon tank. The Tropica is what I guess is referred to as a "cultivar." I also love this plant. It can take on so many different forms... Even when completely blocked of light, it'll just stall. I don't think I've ever had one die outright... Under really strong lighting and low nutrients, it will look like a little green flower with pointy-tipped, wrinkly petals and will send out a flower stalk. With strong lighting and ample nutrients, it will grow quite large and look sort of like a garden weed. It's a matter of taste, but I like it best when it grows like in Sha's photo.

If I can get my hands on a small piece, I'm going to plant it in some sort of tiny container to keep the roots confined. Then I'll try to bury this in the gravel. Maybe I can hide the rim of the container using some polished pebbles and make it look like a "planter" the way they do for small trees. This should also help to keep the overall size of the plant small.

-Naomi
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Old 07-20-2005, 02:23 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gnome
If I can get my hands on a small piece,...-Naomi
If the SF plant swap works out for this month, I think I have a plantlet that is not contributing to the aquascape(invisible) in my high light tank. You probably don't have to worry about its size without CO2. The one in my picture has been there for 6 months

I can probably spare a stem or two(only, it is in the slow tank) of ludwigia arcuata as well.
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Old 07-20-2005, 04:11 PM   #13 (permalink)
 
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Sha,

That's awfully nice of you! But please don't worry about sparing any plants from your low-tech tank. After only a few days of having mine set up, I can see how excruciatingly slow the growth is. I don't want you to have to wait until the next century to have a new stem of Ludwigia grow out. Also, with the Tropica sword - if it looks like pulling up the roots is going to disturb your aquascape at all, just leave it. If I were really desperate, I could pull up the one in my shrimp tank, but I'm sure it's wall-to-wall root from that thing, considering how long it's been there (maybe three years). I figure my unexplained shrimp deaths have slowed down in that tank and I don't want to tempt fate.

I am going to make a list of things I'm going to bring, and things I'd like to have and post them. I'll include L. arcuata. I'm sure there will be people who really need to trim some out of their tanks so leave yours undisturbed. They're so beautiful, I think if you cut them, it'll really leave something missing from your aquascape. I was going to try and find some at Albany, today, but fortunately, I called them before going and got a message saying that due to renovations, they'd be closed on Weds. AND Thurs. It'll probably be for a number of weeks.

BTW, you were right about the Monosolenium not doing so hot. It's already breaking apart and getting eaten by the snails. The two bigger stems of Lag I added the other day seem to be doing a lot better than the previous short pieces. And the ambulia hasn't been growing much, at least that I can see.

Thanks for your generosity! It's the thought that counts . I'll see you in SF on the 31st! FINALLY - it's going to be on a day I can actually go .

-Naomi
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Old 07-20-2005, 04:47 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Don't worry, Naomi, I treat all of my plants as if they don't have any roots and uproot them at will. Water column dosing is the only thing I pay attention to.

I just threw away some L. arcuata trimmings last week. They grow slow, but not that slow. I can spare couple of stems, there will be more branching after the trimming anyway.
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Old 07-20-2005, 11:23 PM   #15 (permalink)
 
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Gee, Sha... Thank you so much! I'm totally grateful. I'd offer to bring something that you're seeking, but I think you have pretty much everything I have . Well, I may be wrong, so if there's anything, please mention it.

Thanks a million!

-Naomi
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Old 07-21-2005, 09:04 AM   #16 (permalink)
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well, Naomi, did you get a chance to aquire any 'mini pellia'? I did get some, but did not have the tank space ready, it melted away in holding container before I realized.
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Old 07-21-2005, 12:34 PM   #17 (permalink)
 
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Hey - you know what? I do!!! Fruitpie actually sent me some, but he later wrote me that it may not be the same one as in that photo that was taken by "dom" (the bright-green one with the crystal red shrimp). It could very well be "coral pellia" or some other miniature variety. Anyway, what happened was that I got the stuff around April or so (sandwiched in wire mesh and some type of netting) and I put it in my 10-gallon. This was approximately the time when I began having problems with GW. Well, I left it in there this whole time, and only last night did I decide to move it into the shrimp tank so the Amano shrimp could do something about the bits of algae and decaying material enmeshed in the sad-looking mini pellia. I don't think it was much of a challenge for the shrimp - it was completely clean by this morning. I'm going to move it into one of my other tanks that gets fertilizer and hope that it'll make a turn for the better this week. I'll try to pick some nice pieces out of the wire mesh, but it's probably going to be a very small amount. I was told that this stuff is supposed to be able to adhere fairly quickly and strongly to driftwood, so you can try to tie it onto something as soon as you get it home. At least it's a good sign that not only did it survive a long trip from Singapore, but a very prolonged period in pea soup.

I'll do what I can! Let's keep our fingers crossed.

-Naomi
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Old 07-21-2005, 02:05 PM   #18 (permalink)
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that's cool, a small piece will suffice. so we are still in search of the "real" 'mini pellia', whatever it actually is. so many plants, so little tank space,... sigh

Are you having any luck with other shrimps currently apart from amano?
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Old 07-21-2005, 03:25 PM   #19 (permalink)
 
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Sent you a PM .
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Old 08-15-2005, 10:42 PM   #20 (permalink)
 
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Time to update. Some very interesting things are happening with my low-nutrient nano.

First off, thanks (for the trillionth time) for the plants, Sha! I trimmed off the roots and put the little Tropica sword into a miniature 1" terra-cotta pot that I got from Michael's Crafts. I then pushed this down into the gravel (in my low-nutrient nano tank)as far as it would go. The very next day I saw the tip of a new leaf poking out from the middle of the crown. It grew out really fast, and it looks like the one in your photo. Perfect! A second leaf is nearly completely-formed, and I have a third leaf making its way out. After it grows out a few more leaves, I'll pluck off all of the old ones. The roots will probably need some trimming by then, too. The arcuata is not doing so hot. The new leaves are crumply and green. I'll wait and see if it improves, though.

So I'm observing very weird stuff... The Lysimachia nummularia 'aurea' that I planted in my low-nutrient nano tank is actually doing WAY better than the stems I put in the high-nutrient one. I can't figure out why this is. The Downoi, however, completely disintegrated in the low-nutrient tank, and has been doing fine in the high (as I would have expected).

I think one of the most-unexpected things I've seen is with the Limnophila sessiflora that I put in the low-nutrient tank. I initially put only one stem in there, and when Sha mentioned that it would stunt with low NO3, sure enough, I noticed that growth completely stopped. I left it in there because I was too lazy to reach in and pick it out. But some days later, I noticed that a new shoot was poking out through the gravel. I guess branching occurred from the buried node. Anyway, I figured it would grow a little bit and die, but instead, it produced this healthy stem with finer, delicate-looking leaves and the internodes are much shorter! This is exactly the type of growth I was hoping for... So it looks a little more like a Myriophyllum of some sort. A few days ago, I added four more stems of L. sessiflora, and I'm hoping that they'll produce the same new growth.

I've been adding about 0.5 mL Excel daily and approximately half of the macros and trace levels that I maintain in my other tanks. Unfortunately, I'm getting algae on the driftwood and petit anubias. I may try raising the phosphate level just a bit to see if that helps.

It's all very slow-growing and slow-going, but I'm enjoying this immensely! If I can get stuff to grow out a little more, I'll post a photo of my little tank .

-Naomi
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