Aquarium vet...new to plants - Page 3 - New to Planted Aquariums - Aquatic Plant Central

Go Back   Aquatic Plant Central > Welcome Forums! > New to Planted Aquariums

New to Planted Aquariums Don't know where to begin? Find your answer here.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-06-2007, 06:28 PM   #21 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 111
iTrader Ratings: 0
Mad Dog is a regular member
Default


Found some java moss at the LFS with the rummy nose tetras and this one was given to me for free because it was out of the water quite a bit...meaning that it was on a rock which was close to the surface (cant remember the term the guy used for that) I need to get some clear string or fishing line to get rid of that highly visible green stuff though. You can also see my B. Rainbow (one of two males), a couple of the yo yo loaches (I have five now), and some neons and rummy nose tetras.

Now, the fish:

Neons under blue actinic lighting...they are like lightning bugs when they turn they flash really nicely!


Those rummy nose tetras (five of them)^^^^^


Of course, otocinclus catfish, I now have 6^^^
Mad Dog is offline   Reply With Quote

Advertisement [Remove Advertisement]
Old 03-06-2007, 06:36 PM   #22 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 111
iTrader Ratings: 0
Mad Dog is a regular member
Default


My pair of Half Black Angels...they are sticking together like glue right now and are doing well thus far!


Close up of one of two male Boesemani Rainbows^^^ The color has since gotten better and hopefully that continues

And I think that is it for the good pictures I have taken so far.

So, at this point, I did not hook up the CO2 yet, but I did dose some Flourish and Flourish Excel. I am ordering the dry nutrients from your sponser as soon as I can pry the credit card back from my wife, LOL! I am going to be full of CO2 questions here pretty soon so if any of you can give me some tips on how to get that set up and working in a manner which would be the least stressful on the fish, I would appreciate it. I think I posted a picture before showing the sugar and yeast system I want to use, and in fact, I have two of them...they are 'rated' for a 20 gallon tank and this is 55 gallons so that is why I got two.

Again, thanks for all the help thus far! I am certain that my questions are just starting to form so be ready for me! LOL
Mad Dog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2007, 07:48 PM   #23 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 557
iTrader Ratings: 0
furballi is a regular member
Default

Most economical method is to purchase a CO2 regulator and empty 5 lb Al tank from an online beer supplier ($40 valve, $50 tank). Add a $15 FABCO AIR NV-55 needle valve and about $10 of misc plumbing.

I inject the CO2 directly into the intake tube of my Hagen Aquaclear 300.

http://www.fabco-air.com/distributors.html
furballi is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 03-06-2007, 07:55 PM   #24 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: The smallest state in the Union RI
Posts: 910
iTrader Ratings: 12
iTrader Positive Rating: 100%
Muirner is a regular member
Default

is that a zebra otocinclus catfish??? How much did you pay for it?
Muirner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2007, 07:56 PM   #25 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Kelley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Coralville, Iowa
Posts: 658
iTrader Ratings: 13
iTrader Positive Rating: 100%
Kelley is a regular member
Default

You are off to a terrific start, Mad Dog! I have a little suggestion for you. A way that you can maximaize your CO2 production is to swap out the bottles that come with the Hagen system for larger plastic bottles of your choosing. On my 29 I am using 2 x 1 gal apple cider jugs. If you can get your hands on some wine-making yeast, try that in your brew. Check out the sticky that JohnN has written in the DIY forum. You will find it quite helpful.

Whatever you do, keep up with that Flourish Excel! At least until you go pressurized!
Kelley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2007, 11:04 PM   #26 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Laith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Posts: 2,307
iTrader Ratings: 0
Laith is a valuable member of the community Laith is a valuable member of the community
Default

Nice start!

I'm not sure exactly what those two grassy plants in the foreground are in the top picture... but normally you'd want to separate out the clump and plant small parts of the plant to cover a larger area. Spreads faster that way.

Of course that's assuming that it's a type of plant that spreads with runners...
Laith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2007, 06:04 AM   #27 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
BryceM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: South Central Idaho, USA
Posts: 4,332
iTrader Ratings: 42
iTrader Positive Rating: 100%
BryceM is an inspiration to us all BryceM is an inspiration to us all BryceM is an inspiration to us all BryceM is an inspiration to us all
Default

Nice start. The most critical time for a new setup is the first 2-3 weeks. The plants will either recover from the stress of the new setup and start growing or they'll die and turn into tons of mush. You want to avoid the later since the mess will be frustrating and contribute to algae issues.

The sooner you can get the CO2 going, the better. It will help get the plants established and will help to minimize early algae issues. Once it grows in a bit you'll be amazed at how good it looks and how much more natural the fish act among the plants. Enjoy!
BryceM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2007, 07:58 PM   #28 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 111
iTrader Ratings: 0
Mad Dog is a regular member
Default

Thank you all for the great input! I was actually pretty nervous, believe it or not, about posting those pictures. I wasn't sure if my 'vision' for this tank was going to be feesable even! From your responses, it sounds like I am at least on the right track for now as far as looks and placement goes.

So...CO2...so many questions, so little memory once I get in front of my computer!

First, I realize that this tank just went from "zero to hero" in less than one day, meaning I know that I bit off a lot with this many plants compared to my experience level. Hopefully I have most of my bases covered right now though...but I do have questions.

So, I am a Project Manager at a Landscape company and right now is the big 'trade show season'. The one we are working on right now is going to feature an outdoor kitchen, complete with a stove/grill, refrigerator, and some high tech beer tap machine. The point being that even though we rented the stove/grill, fridge, and tapper, we had to pay for the working parts of the tapper in order to make it look right for the show. Included in that was a pressurized CO2 tank, a regulator, and of course, the CO2 in that tank.

I have the opportunity to buy this from my boss, for cost basically, and while I am not sure what the regulator controls or if it would be applicable to my aquarium, I wonder if this is a good thing for me to purchase, or if I should skip all of that and buy exactly what I need from an LFS or online store? Also, I am pretty sure that this tank is a 10 or 15 pound variety (ironically, the directions were in every language but english...otherwise we lost those...and the writting on the tank is in chineese or something similar) and I am wondering if this is a good size, and if so, how long would that typically last me if I used it on my 55 gallon tank with the amount of plants I have (hopefully you can get a good idea of types and numbers from my pictures)?

Also, like I said, I have two other CO2 kits which work on the sugar and yeast idea...and I am wondering if I should hook one up and then wait a couple of days to allow the fish and/or plants to adjust before going ahead with the second one....or should I just go for broke and put them both on at the same time? Also, I am wondering if anyone else has a similar device as this one (now that I realize that I didnt post this picture, sorry):


If so, what would be the major difference between this set up and a pressurized CO2 system? How long can I reasonably expect one or both of these kits to last me? How would I know that the CO2 potential is exhausted and it is time to add new sugar and yeast? On top of that, how would I know if my tank is getting enough/too much CO2 from one of these kits? (It says it has a bubble counter, but I am not sure how that works unless I am the one who counts the bubbles) Also, I am not sure if I would even have the ability to slow down the rate of CO2 or not...so if anyone has used these, could you please clarify that for me?

I am also using Flourish and Flourish Excel...my understanding was that the Flourish Excel was a replacement for CO2 and not really something that is more of a suppliment to the CO2. I realize that a lot of products claim to do more than what it can truly do...but I have heard so many people talk positively about this product that I guess I just assumed it is everything it says it is.

As for seperating the plants, I did do some of that....mostly to the dwarf grasses though and only because I hear they will spread really quickly and so smaller would be better. The micro swords went in 'as is' though and I never thought to seperate them. In fact, I think there is a lot of grass growing with the swords and I would like to prune them out to thin the plant down to what it really is...but I am not sure if I can, could, or should do that.

After work today, I checked everything in this tank out very well and none of the fish died, or look stressed/sick. The plants also look very healthy (judging from my landscape background with non-aquatic plants) and are now standing up much straighter than before. When they arrrived, they were also very bright and fully green for the most part (some are a bit red and they also had good color. So, while I realize that this is wwwwaaaayyy too early to be truly confident that these plants and fish are going to make it with little problems, I thought that it was still a good sign to see everything looking good and healthy (as far as I can tell with the plants anyways)

I will leave it at that then and then move forward after getting some responses before I formulate more questions. Thank you for all of your help again!
Mad Dog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2007, 06:28 AM   #29 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
BryceM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: South Central Idaho, USA
Posts: 4,332
iTrader Ratings: 42
iTrader Positive Rating: 100%
BryceM is an inspiration to us all BryceM is an inspiration to us all BryceM is an inspiration to us all BryceM is an inspiration to us all
Default

If there is any way you can afford it I'd strongly recommend moving forward with the pressurized CO2 stuff. Almost everyone who intends to stay in the hobby longer than a few months eventually makes the change. The sugar/yeast thing is just too time-intensive and messy.

A beer tap CO2 system is perfectly fine. Basically what you need is a CO2 tank (a 5lb cylinder lasts 6 months on my 46g), a regulator (preferably with both a high-side and low-side pressure gauge), a needle valve for fine CO2 adjustments (try e-bay), and maybe a bubble counter (to see how fast the stuff is going in). Adjust the regulator down to a working psi of 5-10 and use the needle valve to make fine adjustments. You can add a solenoid too if you'd like to have the ability to turn it on and off with a timer.

How you get the CO2 into the tank is up to you. Many people feed it into the intake of their cansiter filter, others use a DIY in-line reactor, and some use in-tank diffusers. They all seem to work pretty well, but IMO the reactor is the most efficient and straightforward. About 1-2 bubbles per second in the bubble counter is about right for a tank in the 50g range.

As for when - I'd start the CO2 as soon as possible. The difference it makes is enormous.
BryceM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2007, 08:18 AM   #30 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Kelley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Coralville, Iowa
Posts: 658
iTrader Ratings: 13
iTrader Positive Rating: 100%
Kelley is a regular member
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by guaiac_boy View Post
If there is any way you can afford it I'd strongly recommend moving forward with the pressurized CO2 stuff. Almost everyone who intends to stay in the hobby longer than a few months eventually makes the change. The sugar/yeast thing is just too time-intensive and messy.
.
This is excellent advice. Right now, I am doing DIY CO2 on a 29 gal. I LOATHE it!! It is so difficult to maintain adequate and consistant levels of CO2, especially when the temp of our house is only 67 degrees. I use two x 1 gal containers. which are capable of lasting much longer than the Hagen nutrafin containers. I switch them out every week, just to keep production up in my cold house.(Remember, output of CO2 depends on the metabolic rate of the yeast.) The result has been that I am constantly battling algae. Though there are other factors, I am sure, that contribute to this, most people here would tell me that my algae woes are likely due to inadequate CO2.

As for where you can buy some of the stuff that you need, send JohnN a PM. He is selling all kinds of goodies to help you with your CO2 needs. He's got CO2-proof tubing, brass check valves, needle valves and sweetwater fine-pore airstones that you can use to diffuse the CO2. He ships fast, his prices are very low and he's a very nice guy who is a mod here. I have purchased from him and recommend him highly. If he doesn't have what you want, check out Rex Grigg at http://www.rexgrigg.com/ . He sells CO2 supplies for a reasonable price and his site tells you how to assemble a regulator from parts. I recommend all beginners read this site. It's full of great information. He even has directions for building a CO2 reactor, if you choose this method.

Best of luck with everything! I'm going pressurized within the next couple of weeks and I can't wait! If you can't just yet, keep up the Excel and try wine-making yeast to help your brews last longer.
Kelley is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Aquatic Plant Central > Welcome Forums! > New to Planted Aquariums > Aquarium vet...new to plants

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Aquatic Plant Forum Replies Last Post
Encyclopedia of Aquarium Plants irish General Aquarium Plants Discussions 7 02-09-2007 07:02 AM
Problem with plants in aquarium serge1966 New to Planted Aquariums 1 07-12-2006 09:27 AM
>>New to Aquarium Plants (Need Help with Low Light/Low Tech Plants)!!<< nap83 New to Planted Aquariums 10 03-02-2006 08:17 PM
Cattails as aquarium plants?? HeyPK Local Biotopes 0 10-19-2004 05:33 PM
My aquarium plants of soft water biker Photography 1 09-08-2004 06:51 PM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:51 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1