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Old 11-27-2004, 11:45 PM   #1 (permalink)
baj
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Hi,
I borrowed a couple of books - Aquatic Photosynthesis by Falkowski and Raven and Light and Photosyntheses in Aquatic Ecosystems by John T Kirk. I went through the first one and it focuses heavily on ocean systems and simple autotrophs, though it discusses concepts in a quantitative way, which I prefer. I havent yet had the time to read the second one. If someone could suggest a good reference book on aquatic plant physiology, I would be grateful. I am a beginner in terms of plant physiology but I think have enough scientific background to read graduate level books on the subject. FW planted tanks started out as a hobby but I think if I had spent as much time on my phd topic as this I might have graduated by now . Anyway, given that so many conjectures and uninformed opinions are being spewed out as facts out there, I just wanted to get a handle on the subject.
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Old 11-28-2004, 02:35 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Ah, I share a similar interest. Unfortunately, there are not many good aquatic plant physiology books out there.

1) I would refer you to Aquatic Biology the journal. Excellent work.

2) THE BIOLOGY OF AQUATIC PLANTS, by H. Schenck. 2003. 162 pp.
(Published by Koeltz Scientific Books, Herrnwaldstr. 6, D61462 Koenigstein, Germany. ISBN 3-906166-11-2. $57.00 plus S/H. Email: [email protected] WWW: http://www.koeltz.com)

3) Introduction to Freshwater Vegetation by Donald N Reimer Krieger Publications

4) The Biology of Aquatic Vascular Plants by C.D. Sculthorpe

5) Other journals:

Journal of Phycology
Phycologia
Limnology and Oceanography
Hydrobiologia
Journal of Plankton Research
Freshwater Biology
Archiv für Hydrobiologie
Journal of Aquatic Plant Management
Journal of Freshwater Ecology
Journal of Applied Phycology
Australian Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research

Good luck. Happy to discuss physiology concepts here.
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Old 12-10-2004, 11:34 AM   #3 (permalink)
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The other day I found a paper online (forgot the title and authors, sorry) which researched a phenomenon in the common anacharis (egeria densa), they found that under high light and high nutrient conditions and low co2 levels, the plant has the ability to change the ph in a thin layer of water around its leaves, so that the ph shift (acidification) causes the co2-hco3 balance in water to shift towards co2 which then diffuses into the leaves. is this the only plant that has this mechanism of shifting ph around itself to uptake co2 when tother coditions for photosynthesis are optimal? What are your thoughts on utilizing this capability of the plant in a home aquarium?

Simple google search gave me these:
<a href ="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=121214 54&dopt=Abstract">Nih Pubmed index</a>
Full Text from Blackwell Synergy
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Old 12-10-2004, 03:05 PM   #4 (permalink)
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If this is correct...

I would only expect to see this ability in plants from still water conditions, no point in trying to change the surounding pH in a current.

Otherwise, it looks like they are just talking about biogenic decalcification as the plant changing the local pH (which it does) to push the CO2 dissolution equation. I'll take a gander at the paper. Well I would if the site would let me.
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Old 12-28-2004, 10:48 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Hutchinson, G.E. 1975. A Treatise on Limnology, Vol. III: Limnological Botany. John Wiley &amp; Sons, New York. 660 pp. is a more recent review of the scientific literature on aquatic plants than Sculthorpe's book. I think it is out of print.
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Old 11-14-2005, 09:11 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Art_Giacosa
1) I would refer you to Aquatic Biology the journal. Excellent work.
Did you mean "Aquatic Botany"?
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Old 11-15-2005, 07:53 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
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Probaly, if it's not on the list, it should be.

The Egeria densa as well as Hydrilla both do what is called indirect bicarbonate use.

Algae typically do direct.
pH differences between the ab and adxials leaf surfaces can range up 4 pH units. The plant pumps out lots of H+'s on the lower abaxial leaf side which changes the HCO3 to CO2 for plant uptake, but that occurs out in the water, not on the plant's leaf surface through direct enzyme action.

These plant/genera are not like most of the plants we keep. For one, they don't have stomata. Leaves are 2 cells thick. Use cytoplasmic streaming under high light just to name a few.

Regards,
Tom Barr
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Old 11-17-2005, 03:41 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Limnological Botany is a text written in the 70's, not the journal "Aquatic Botany", although a subscription to that would be very worthwhile.

Tom, my prof briefly mentioned CO2 pumps in less advanced plants, is that what you're describing?
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Old 11-17-2005, 09:35 PM   #9 (permalink)
 
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CO2 ccm's is likely what he meant.

CCM=> search APD=> Carbon concentrating mechanisms.
Big with algae.

C4 does it spacially, CAM does it temporally. Any malate type storage can act as a CCM to increase RUSICO effieincy.
Indirect vs direct Bicarb use is a sub heading perhaps

No sure what he meant based on what you said here with lower plants.
Email me off list for more on CO2.

Regards,
Tom Barr
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