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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A lot of the ditches in the Jackson, Mississippi area have lost the variety of aquarium plants they used to have because they have been taken over by either a Polygonum species or Alternanthera philoxeroides Alligator weed. We have had several years with below normal rainfall which may have contributed to the loss of other species, or the species that used to be there (Ludwigia, Micranthemum etc.) are pioneer species that get replaced in a process of succession. So, I was glad to run across a new ditch that was created about a year and a half ago that has already acquired an interesting variety of plants. It was created when a bicycle path was put in last fall and the path blocked water flow from a woods creating standing water about 6 inches deep along the path. Ludwigia palustris showed up early this spring and grew with astonishing rapidity. At first I thought that Ludwigia was the only plant, but closer examination showed a number of other species. had also made it there in only one season. I found Ludwigia glandulosa, Bacopa routundifolia, Lindernia dubia, an Ammannia species, Ditch stonecrop (Penthorum sedoides), a possible Mimulus species and some Polygonium. Photos, below show all but the Polygonum.



This photo shows the extensive growth of Ludwigia palustris. There is a Ludwigia glandulosa plant in the lower right corner that I did not recognize when I took the picture.









 

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Very nice. So cool! I'll be exploring some lakes and ponds in the Sierra foothills soon for some aquatic plants. Will share some photos then too.
 

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What a find! As I look at your pxs. it occurs to me that I would not even know what I am looking at. I only recognize the immersed versions of the plants. The emmersed versions can look so different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I find it very useful to stand at the edge of the water and look over the plants with binoculars. Most binoculars made these days can focus as close as five or six feet. I never would have seen the Bacopa or the Lindernia if I hadn't had binoculars.
 

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Very cool. Thanks for sharing man. :D Have you tried the Ammannia species or the Bacopa rotundifolia submersed yet?
 

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Very cool Paul. Have you determined whether the Ammania is A. coccinea or A. ariculata? I had one of them once, but it got smothered among the other weeds. They are worth a shot in any case.

Some of the L. dubia was growing submersed? We found some of it growing that way up here. It's a very nice plant.

The Penthrorum will grow as a somewhat small creeping foreground stem if it gets a lot of light. With less, it grows larger and taller.

I'd try the Bacopa rotundifolia submersed for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Do you still have any of those plants Paul? I think the Bacopa in particular is interesting.
I have not been able to find the Bacopa, but I collected the others plus a few more plants not shown in the pictures that might or might not be able to be grown submersed. . I gave them 4 minutes in 5% bleach and then floated them in my guppy tank. They all took the bleach treatment with no visible damage and most have grown roots. The only one that has not rooted is the Ammania species, which looks like A. coccinea to me. The Ammania stem is still alive, but I think it is a victim of senescence, as the plants in the ditch have mostly turned brown and are dropping seeds. The Lindernia stems do not look very likely to be grown submersed, as all the leaves below the water surface have died and all the new growth is emersed.
 

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Are the flowers of the Ammania right up against the stem on very short pedicels? If so, it is A. coccinea. Of not, A. ariculata.

That's strange that the L. dubia is having trouble. I've grown it submersed for long periods without issue. It didn't really even have trouble adapting. In fact, we even found it growing submersed this past summer. It may be that you're seeing a subspecies less capable of submersed growth or something to that effect. There is a closely related species with flowers on longer pedicels, but as far as I know, it isn't found in habitats that are so wet in the first place. Strange.

According to Missouriplants.com, Bacopa rotundifolia does grow submersed, so keep your eye out for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
No, It may be a Bacopa, but it isn't rotundifolia. Here is a good picture of B. rotundifolia collected in Florida. The picture, taken by bms (Benicio Sanchez), is in the Native Plants section.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Your plant could be Bacopa caroliniana. Does it have an aromatic smell if you crush a leaf? If it does, then it is definitely B. caroliniana.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I have had the plants collected from the new ditch plus a plant of Lobelia cardinalis collected from a cypress swamp about 20 miles north of Jackson floating in my guppy tank for about a month and a half. The tank is already overcrowded with plants, and so the floated plants (all initially treated with 5% bleach for four minutes) all grew out of the water with the exception of the Lobelia. I took them all out today and planted them submersed in a well lit 75 gallon tank. We shall see how they do. Here are pictures of the plants just before I planted them in the 75 gallon tank.

Penthorum sedoides (Ditch Stonecrop) This plant grew a lot in the guppy tank and produced a lot of roots


Ludwigia palustris and two small plants. The small plant to the left is all that is left of the Ammania coccina. the one to the right is a little plant of Lindernia dubia.


Ludwigia glandulosa. This stem tripled its length, but lost all its underwater leaves.


The two little plants, enlarged. Lindernia to the left and Ammania coccina to the right (picture was rotated 180 degrees)


The Lobelia cardinalis plant from the cypress swamp. Its growth is all submersed, and it has only produced little stubs of roots.


Lindernia dubia to the left and Ranunculus laxicaulis to the right The main plant of the Ranunculus is at the bottom of the picture, and the runner that grew from it grew entirely after the plant was placed in the guppy tank. The runner and its leaves were submersed.
 

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there are alot of these plants growing here in the rivers and ponds here in south carolina. i have got alot of bacopa carolinia,ludwigia repens x, hornwort,duckweed and ammannia.

the bacopa and repens grew great after a few weeks. others didnt do so well.

fissidens also grows around here in swamps and rivers.

haveyou checked the ph,kh,gh of the ditch? ive found the river here to have a ph in the 7's
 
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