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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have found some wonderful spots on different lakes here in Minnesota that have fairly easy access to some otherwise-hard-to- get-to plants. I'm wondering if after I collect what I can, do I need to do anything to clean the plants before putting them in the tank? Specifically to remove anything contagious to fish. I'm just curious what the process should be. Thanks.

Tim
 

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The old Innes book has a method of dosing either potassium permanganate or lime water to get rid of snails etc. I am usually more concerned with algae. Same goes with store bought plants. If the plants have hair algae on them I will try to do a 3 minute bath in 1:20 bleach. I don't think I have ever killed a plant this way, but I have killed all the leaves on plants and it can take a long time for them to recover. But if there is any green in a node or at the tip of a stem they will generally recover.

Please let us see your finds up there in Minnesota.

Steve Pituch
 

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I definitely will :) . I found a bay in a little-used lake that is very shallow and clear. There are some lilies growing- two different types. A carpet like plant slowly spreading in patches. Some marginal grass-type stuff. I'm gonna slog around to see what else I can find. Nice driftwood up there too. I'll take pics of the location and the plants I collect.

Tim

PS- all sorts of minnow, frogs and turtles too, but I won't be taking anything with legs :) .
 

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when giving plants the bleach treatment, it is important to have a tank ready with good growing conditions to put the treated plants in. Float them for a few days and then plant them in an open well-lit location. CO2, good light, good levels of nutrients, particularly nitrogen and phosphorus, help the treated plant recover. If the treated plant has really taken a beating and its survival looks doubtful, get a small container, preferably glass, that is about 2 inches deep, and fill it with topsoil and place the plant on the surface of the soil weighed down with a pebble or two. The soil is a better source of iron, which will be available to roots as soon as they get into the soil. If you try to root the cutting in gravel with soil underneath, the plant may not get needed iron until its roots get all the way through the gravel to the deeper iron source. A weakened cutting may not have the reserve food supply to get its roots that far.
 

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When I collected plants from a lake in Northern Michigan, I simply ran each stem under a tap for a few seconds. I didn't have any troubles, other than the fact that the plants were from a coldwater lake and and they did not like the fact that I wasn't using a chiller :)

I found some neat stuff. I imagine what you might find in Minnesota would be similar. These were the ones I got a positive ID on before they all melted from the heat:

Nuphar advena
Myriophyllum sibiricum
Nymphaea odorata
Najas flexilis
Vallisneria americana var. americana
Brasenia schreberi
Potamogeton richardsonii
Potamogeton crispus
 

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HeyPK said:
when giving plants the bleach treatment, it is important to have a tank ready with good growing conditions to put the treated plants in. Float them for a few days and then plant them in an open well-lit location. CO2, good light, good levels of nutrients, particularly nitrogen and phosphorus, help the treated plant recover. If the treated plant has really taken a beating and its survival looks doubtful, get a small container, preferably glass, that is about 2 inches deep, and fill it with topsoil and place the plant on the surface of the soil weighed down with a pebble or two. The soil is a better source of iron, which will be available to roots as soon as they get into the soil. If you try to root the cutting in gravel with soil underneath, the plant may not get needed iron until its roots get all the way through the gravel to the deeper iron source. A weakened cutting may not have the reserve food supply to get its roots that far.
:?: :?: :?:

What does the soil do to the water? Does it raise or lover pH? I am using aragonite as a substrate for the tank I'm setting up right now since I want the high pH. If I need to remove the plants for tank cleaning will the soil swirl through my water? I only have one other tank, a 10 gallon and am tired of seeing my plants taking turns floating. Is there iron in tank critter's waste?

The main thing I needed to learn about is Potassium Permanganate. I have heard about it but can't find it for sale anywhere. I am sooooo tired of these pest snails. I'd like to move some of my lacy (from the pest snails chomping on them) floating plants to my new tank. Also I'd like to have some type of system of introducing new plants safely.

Another thing, is it easy to wash the Potassium Permanganate off the plant when you are finished soaking.

Thanks so much, Theresa :)
 
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