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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My thread wherein I was looking to buy some U. graminifolia started to turn into a general discussion about the genus so I thought it best to start a discussion thread here. http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forumapc/sale-trade/53499-wtb-utricularia-graminifolia.html

Utricularia is the genus containing terrestrial (~80% of species), aquatic (~15% of species), and epiphytic (~5% of species) carnivorous plants. They are well adapted to nutrient poor soils and bodies of water with high light conditions. In nature they grow in areas with plentiful water and sunlight where the limiter is having very nutrient poor soils. In order to obtain nutrients they have bladder traps that digest small animals. Aquatics in general tend to have larger traps, sometimes up to a few mm in diameter. Terrestrials and epiphytes have smaller traps, usually under a mm. For the aquarium we should only concern ourselves with the terrestrials and aquatics.

The aquatics have feathery leaves and generally float in the water, though the smaller species can wrap themselves around plants and rocks and grow that way. U. gibba, U. inflata, and especially U. olivacea are examples of smaller Utricularia that easily become invasive in the aquarium. Avoid these, they're only marginally easier to get rid of than Cladophora. Some of the larger species like U. foliosa, U. macrorhiza, and U. striata may do well in the aquarium. They can be divided into those that grow suspended and affixed to sediment but in general their stems are almost always above the substrate and they don't form flattened leaves.

Also, Aldrovanda vesicularia (Waterwheel) is not a bladderwort though it is very similar in habit and form. It is the closest relative of Dionea musicupla (Venus' Flytrap) - the trapping mechanisms are fundamentally different.

PS: some of the Utricularia have terrestrial AND aquatic forms, while others have only one form.

Terrestrials have flat blade leaves, roots, and submersed traps. They grow via rhizomes under the substrate. So far I am only aware of one species being used in the aquarium trade, U. graminifolia. I estimate however that there should be 150 other terrestrial species with potential to grow submersed and anchored to the substrate. My hypothesis is this: Terrestrial Utricularia are adapted to growing in waterlogged soils with their roots and traps permanently submersed even though their leaves may not be. They must also tolerate periodic flooding for sustained periods of time. These conditions indicate a plant that has potential to grow fully submersed in the aquarium. U. graminifolia is an example of this.

If you want to learn more, check out this FAQ http://www.sarracenia.com/faq/faq5580.html

If anyone happens upon a terrestrial one (they are very inconspicuous, you usually have to catch them in bloom to ID them) consider trying it out submersed. I have identified 4 terrestrial species that grow nearby and I'm going to try to collect some for the aquarium.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Further reading indicates that there are more growth forms. We're looking for ones that can grow as "subaffixed aquatics"
In particular, U. cornuta looks to be extremely promising in this regard, especially since its very small and cute. This grows locally and I will attempt to locate it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
U. graminifolia is in subgenus Bivalvaria, section Oligocista. Its known to the botanical world to grow as a terrestrial/affixed aquatic and is from China/Indo-Pacific. Mislabeling is apparently common so a proper ID would require growing the flowers.

This subgenus is composed of terrestrials with a few doubling as affixed aquatics.

U. bosminifera, foeveolata, heterosepala, reticulata, smithiana, and uliginosa are all listed as also being affixed aquatics. These grow across Asia and Australia mainly.
 

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I found this thread while looking for information about growing U. graminifolia immersed.

Terrestrial Utricularia produce lots and lots of tiny, orchid-like blooms. (Some species do this more easily than others, though!) Here is a picture of one of mine in September, 2007:



Easily as pretty above water as underwater. Anyone growing U. graminifolia in their aquarium should consider growing some emersed, as well. :)
 

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I found this thread while looking for information about growing U. graminifolia immersed.

Terrestrial Utricularia produce lots and lots of tiny, orchid-like blooms. (Some species do this more easily than others, though!) Here is a picture of one of mine in September, 2007:



Easily as pretty above water as underwater. Anyone growing U. graminifolia in their aquarium should consider growing some emersed, as well. :)
Wow, now I have to try this too.
 

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I found this thread while looking for information about growing U. graminifolia immersed.

Terrestrial Utricularia produce lots and lots of tiny, orchid-like blooms. (Some species do this more easily than others, though!) Here is a picture of one of mine in September, 2007:



Easily as pretty above water as underwater. Anyone growing U. graminifolia in their aquarium should consider growing some emersed, as well. :)
Hi! Any tip's in growing this beaut' emersed?
 

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Quote from Fortuna Wolf 08/2008:

"If anyone happens upon a terrestrial one (they are very inconspicuous, you usually have to catch them in bloom to ID them) consider trying it out submersed. I have identified 4 terrestrial species that grow nearby and I'm going to try to collect some for the aquarium."

Please be cautious when collecting U.S. Native carnivorous plants. Quite a few, if not most, of them are endangered in the wild, and it is a Federal offense to collect them. If you don't know exactly what species you are collecting, then please do not take it from the wild. It might be one of the few of it's kind remaining. If you do know what species you are collecting, then please check with the USDA via the site below to make sure it is not Federally endangered or protected on a state level.

The best option is to purchase the plants from a reputable seller that has gotten permission to collect starter plants, and is selling only plants that have been propagated in their nursery.

Our love for plants should not be the cause of their demise.

http://www.plants.usda.gov/index.html
 

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I found this thread while looking for information about growing U. graminifolia immersed.

Terrestrial Utricularia produce lots and lots of tiny, orchid-like blooms. (Some species do this more easily than others, though!) Here is a picture of one of mine in September, 2007:



Easily as pretty above water as underwater. Anyone growing U. graminifolia in their aquarium should consider growing some emersed, as well. :)
Are you kidding me...This is beyond gorgeous.
 

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That's absolutely gorgeous! Thanks for sharing the photo, tundrafour!!!
 
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