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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The term "allelopathy" refers to the ability of some plants to produce chemicals that prevent the growth of different plant species near them. The concept is well documented in terrestrial plants, but it is controversial in aquatic plants.

Below is a link to a thread that I started at Tom Barr's site. In it I maintained that a large number of C. wenditii was killing all of the other plants in a 29 gallon aquarium. Most people there disagreed with me, BTW.

http://www.barrreport.com/general-p...endtii-allelopathy.html?highlight=allelopathy

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
As I said in the thread, the 50 crypts occupied the left side of the tank. I planted vals, E. tenellus, and hygros, and even tossed in some duckweed.

None survived, and none of the rooted plants developed new roots.

Before that, other plants occupied the right side of the tank, and over a 6 month period all died, including a large stand of Java fern that had been there for 3 years.

When I took down the tank, the roots of the crypts had not spread much beyond the half-tank where they were planted. There was no sign of "root binding", and the duckweed and the hygros wouldn't have cared, anyway.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
This aquarium had been set up for 4 years, and the crypts had been the dominant plant for at least the last two. It might be that the allelopathic chemical(s) build up over time. The effect, if any, would be more pronounced in a NPT which doesn't get a lot of water changing.

The crypts and other plants lived in harmony for all but the last 6 to 9 months of the tanks existence, when all of the other plants slowly died and new ones died real fast.

But I don't know for sure.

Bill
 
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