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Formosa does not want to breed.
Therefore, I added rice fish.
Do you feed your Heterandria formosa live food? Mine Neoheterandria elegans didn't really want to breed until I started hatching artemia for them. Recently I switched to Grindal worms and these seem to be even better. Also what's the tank temperature? Heterandria likes it on the cooler side from what I read about them.

Although as you've added another fish species to the tank, formosa fry will probably have problems to survive, they are very fragile and easy snack for bigger fish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
Perhaps a livebearer breeds in other conditions.
She needs thick thickets of grass, less often to change water ...
And really, for me it is too small a fish.
 

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What you write is very interesting.
The temperature is room, I do not specifically heat and do not cool - now t+24C.
In summer, I feed live Daphnia, in winter - Drosophila.
I do not breed worms - it is very difficult.
I have no personal experience with them, but read a couple of articles/first hand experience reports and from what I recall, they do best at about 20-22C. 24C should be still fine.

How long do you have them? Sometimes it can take a few weeks or even months for first fry to appear (the same applies to Neoheterandria elegans).

Breeding of Grindal worms is actually quite easy, the hardest part is usually to obtain a starter culture. After that and a couple of "learning weeks" you'll have a few boxes with stable colonies of worms suitable for daily feeding of adult fish and their fry. :)
 

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I once did that using only garden soil..sifted so it was just the clay soils we have. No covering at all. By a window,with only one of the small bulb water lilies and a male Betta...So other plants that I can't recall.
What I remember most was that I would feed all my fish in multiple conventional tanks live worms and brine shrimp- cheap here by San Francisco bay. After he are all he could...I would put more in. A few hours later,the worms were half in the soil and half out..wiggling their red bodys. Sun by the window caused pearling.
That must have been the early 80's.
btw,The water with no filter at all..was semi clear. When it had no fish..rotifers showed up,daphnia.
 

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I once did that using only garden soil..sifted so it was just the clay soils we have. No covering at all. By a window,with only one of the small bulb water lilies and a male Betta...So other plants that I can't recall.
What I remember most was that I would feed all my fish in multiple conventional tanks live worms and brine shrimp- cheap here by San Francisco bay. After he are all he could...I would put more in. A few hours later,the worms were half in the soil and half out..wiggling their red bodys. Sun by the window caused pearling.
That must have been the early 80's.
btw,The water with no filter at all..was semi clear. When it had no fish..rotifers showed up,daphnia.
This sounds like a wonderful and memorable tank. Nature at its best!

I have had dirt tanks without a gravel cover. They do fine. Garden soil is best for this, because the biofilms hold the small clay particles together. (Fresh organic soils will float to the surface.)
 
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