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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I borrowed a couple of books - Aquatic Photosynthesis by Falkowski and Raven and Light and Photosyntheses in Aquatic Ecosystems by John T Kirk. I went through the first one and it focuses heavily on ocean systems and simple autotrophs, though it discusses concepts in a quantitative way, which I prefer. I havent yet had the time to read the second one. If someone could suggest a good reference book on aquatic plant physiology, I would be grateful. I am a beginner in terms of plant physiology but I think have enough scientific background to read graduate level books on the subject. FW planted tanks started out as a hobby but I think if I had spent as much time on my phd topic as this I might have graduated by now :) . Anyway, given that so many conjectures and uninformed opinions are being spewed out as facts out there, I just wanted to get a handle on the subject.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The other day I found a paper online (forgot the title and authors, sorry) which researched a phenomenon in the common anacharis (egeria densa), they found that under high light and high nutrient conditions and low co2 levels, the plant has the ability to change the ph in a thin layer of water around its leaves, so that the ph shift (acidification) causes the co2-hco3 balance in water to shift towards co2 which then diffuses into the leaves. is this the only plant that has this mechanism of shifting ph around itself to uptake co2 when tother coditions for photosynthesis are optimal? What are your thoughts on utilizing this capability of the plant in a home aquarium?

Simple google search gave me these:
Nih Pubmed index
Full Text from Blackwell Synergy
 
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