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The ammonia levels seem to be quite high. If the test is indeed accurate then you will want to do a few large water changes over the course of the week to reduce the ammonia, especially if you want to add fish anytime soon.

The short hairs are probably black beard algae (BBA) from what I can see in the picture. This algae goes away with good CO2 levels, or if you dose flourish excel directly onto the algae with a syringe.

The second picture isn't that clear, but it looks like the java leaf is decaying which happens sometimes due to old age. If there is indeed a film covering the leaf and it comes off easily, then it is diatoms (they aren't algae). They will go away on their own and usually show up in new tanks.

The third picture looks like fungus to me which sometimes happens when you add wood to the tank. That should also go away on its own within a few days or so. It isn't harmful at any rate.

The milky white water is from a bacterial bloom. This will subside on its own when the nutrients released by the soil have settled. The bacteria is using the ammonia/organics to grow so water changes should help reduce this problem.

Also, I would suggest you lower your lighting duration to 7 hours for the first few weeks until the tank stabilizes, otherwise you will get some horrific algae problems. What type of light are you using? What are the watts, and spectrum (Kelvin rating).

Your tank doesn't look too bad though. Hope this helps :)
 

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CO2 will help no matter how experienced you are.

Honestly your tank doesn't seem too bad. I think you should give it time, keep the lights on for 7-8 hours and let things settle. Virtually all new tanks have algae issues, so what you are experiencing is not uncommon. Don't waste more money until you know it won't work.

If in two months time your tank hasn't settled in then you might want to think about getting another substrate to cap the aquasoil. Fluorite or eco-complete are good choices for this. Ultimately even in the worst case scenario you won't need to tear the tank down or get rid of the aquasoil.

Patience :)
 
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