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I have bleached driftwood. It may lighten the colour to some degree, depending how much bleach, how long it's soaked, etc. For the time needed to kill algae it won't do much to the colour of most woods used in tanks though.

I am curious as to why the recipe for a 5% solution of bleach did not specify what strength bleach to use.

Today, bleach comes in a number of different dilutions. As for containing other additives, laundry bleach is almost always only sodium hypochlorite and water, though a few do contain some scent. If it has scent it will say so, lemon or fresh scent usually. Some other cleaners have bleach, but they are not usually laundry specific.

Standard laundry bleach for many many years was 5.25% sodium hypochlorite. Nowadays, you'll find it anywhere from 3% to above 7%, and pool bleach is exactly the same stuff, but the strength is between 10% and 11% in the brands I've seen.

If a laundry bleach bottle label says Ultra strength, it's usually 6%. If it's dirt cheap, no name or some off brand, 3%. If it says fabric safe, 4% is commonly the dilution used.

Name brands like Chlorox or Javex that don't say Ultra or fabric safe are usually still 5.25%. But it's becoming very common for the labels to leave out the percentage completely, because it makes it harder for consumers to compare products accurately and I wish it was not permitted to not state the percentage.

Pool bleach, depending on price, can be the best deal, but you can really only tell for sure if the label tells you how much sodium hypochlorite is in the bottle and then you need a calculator to determine the best price per ounce, pint, milllitre or litre, whatever measure you're using

To make a 5% solution accurately, you need to know the percentage of bleach the bottle you have contains.
 

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Thanks for the tip ! I'll have to try a hot tub place.

Oddly enough, long before some bright lad came up with Chlorox, all bleach was sold only as dry sodium hypochlorite. If you didn't dissolve it properly or you spilled it, your jeans or whatever else would have big white blotches and sometimes outright holes. Therefore, the dry crystals should be handled with some care, but it sure would make it easier to obtain an accurate dilution.
 
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