Aquatic Plant Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
My tank has a Steady PH of 8.4 and High GH(about 23dH or between 320 and 530ppm) and KH (about 12-15dKH), I have tried a Ton of plants all have died except 2 sword plants(i would like to have more than just Swords)I have tried a few different plants. Java moss,Java Fern, Anubis, Dwarf Hair Grass,Waterlily,Barclaya,Aponogeton and a few others i cant remember the names of, All have Died some quicker than others. I am running 108 watts 10,000 T5 HO lighting and DIY Yeast CO2 Injection. And i have some type of Sword that is the ONLY plants that haven't died. it is a 55g tank Freshwater. with a pretty heavy fish load.so i know i am getting tons of fertilizer. But As i Said the water is Very close to African Rift Lake conditions(even though this isn't what i wanted i just had to use what i had on hand), and i am really having a hard time finding plants that will grow in it. So i really feel your pain on the Hard Water Issue. Im gonna try some Vals and See how they do, The plants i have been told to try such as Java Fern,Java Moss and Anubis have all died. I just find it hard to believe that NO plants grow in African Rift Lake's! Or is it that we just cant get the plants that DO grow their HERE in the states?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Hope for all you rift lake tank keepers and Liquid rock havers!!!!!! Below is an email i recivied from a Biologist who specializes in Invasive Aquatic plants. YA for talking to the experts!

"My experience is mostly with invasive's like hydrilla which you don’t want to use. I know that Vallisneria does well in alkaline, hard waters. I think Myriophyllum and Bacopa do Ok in hard waters too. Some aquatic plants can absorb the carbonate salts and strip away the carbon from them, and use that as their carbon supply. The list of plants capable of doing this includes many that do very well in aquaria, including Ceratophyllum demersum, Cryptocoryne becketti, Echinodorus bleheri, Egeria densa, Elodea canadensis, and Vallisneria spp — all popular and easy to obtain species. If you have hard water and don’t want to be bogged down with carbon dioxide fertilization, then these are definitely the plants for you! Admittedly, some of these plants are fussy in other ways. Echinodorus bleheri, for example, needs a rich substrate and good, strong lighting, but Ceratophyllum demersum and most of the Vallisneria are adaptable and easy to keep. If you want to keep live bearers, then Ceratophyllum demersum is difficult to beat as a floating plant that provides a refuge for newly born fry. Egeria densa, on the other hand, is a sturdy, fast-growing species ideally suited to subtropical tanks. Vallisneria spp. are perhaps the most versatile aquarium plants."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
I use RO for evaporation replacement, just so the hard water won't get any harder. But for large water changes on a regular basis, it took all the fun out keeping the tank and made it a chore. No point in that. I'll occasionally do a big RO water change to reset the tank (some of those top-offs are tapwater) but it's just not worth the bother as a regular thing. 'Serious' about growing plants under water? Are you insane? ;-)
Agree RO/DI is a pain in the neck, the big advantage is you control Exactly what is in your water.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top