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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
where can i buy it except those online fish supply. what kind of stores sell those tubes? im going to ask paintball gun shop see if they have...

thanks for helping me out,

Tim
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
hi,

i'm not talking about silicone tube. i have it, but it couldn't connect tightly with manifold/needle valves. i think pressure come out of needle valve is too strong. it will pump tube out.

i use normal air tube connect from needle valve to check valve. after check valve i use silicone tube. i think i may need to replace them to co2 tube if they really work since i turn on my co2 24 hrs/day.

with my experience, if you are going to use manifold with multiple tanks, don't need solenoid valve. save some $$$ coz when timer turn on solenoid valve everyday, co2 won't deliver to all your tanks. co2 will go to the highest pressure with shortest tube first. because of water flowing back to tubes after power turn off, the rest of tubes dont have enough pressure to push water back; therefore, you have to adjust it every single day. i'm tired of that, so i turn on my co2 24hrs/day with less bubble/second.

please give me more info if you can.

thank you very much,

Tim
 

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I run my CO2 at around 12psi, at this pressure I am able to turn the CO2 off using a regular stainless air valve without any of the silicone tubing popping off. I also run CO2 24/7 and have been using silicone tubing for many years without problems. If your needle valve has an undersized barb you might want to use a small plastic tie as a sort of hose clamp.

I have tried CO2 hose in the past but it's too stiff and won't bend nicely, it's a real pain to work with IMO.

Regarding using multiple feeds from a manifold, I find one needs to increase PSI slightly and reduce it significantly at the needle valves, this maintains good pressure behind all needle valves on the manifold.

Hope that helps
Giancarlo Podio
 

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Home depot or a hardware store will probably sell them cheaper than a hobby store. You can also get the fancy ones that allow you to remove them without having to cut them. In absence of these, I've used regular plastic coated wire ties in the past, there's always plenty of those around the house.

Giancarlo Podio
 

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Tim,

Yes, you don't need a solenoid or pH probe just run it 24/7.

You do need a needle valve for each tank. That way you will get the right amount of co2 to each tank.

Yes the wire ties work. I use thicker wire, I wrap it around the hose twice, then use a pair of pliers to twist the wire tight. No leaks this way. Use some soap bubbles to check for leaks.

Steve Pituch
 

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I have used telephone wires on mine. Strip off the coating and you have four seperate wires underneath. They are small but fairly easy to work with. Wrap your connection a couple times and twist it with some pliers like Steve mentioned.
 

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CO2 is corrosive and will also diffuse out of regular tubings. No noticeable effects on bubbling but waste is there, up to 25% I heard from online accounts.

I use pure airline tubing, black color and very rigid, not sure what material. Looks better and saves money in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thanks all replies... i got ties at hobby shop and air condtion supply. don't go hobby shop. i bought the thinnest one at hobby shop. dammmm... 10 of 4" ties in a bag $1.25, 5.5" at air condition supply with 134 ties in a bag$1.95... what the...

thanks again,

Tim
 
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