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Hi guys,

Niko, why would a power failure require that a solenoid be used to turn off the CO2? I run my setup at about 15 psi, and use the $11 Clippard needle valves to regulate the rate going into three tanks. I run them 24/7. I don't think a power failure would matter much, although my KH is 7, and it tends to buffer any big pH changes.

A 20# cylinder lasts about 6 months for 220 gallons.

Just to clarify. A 2 gauge (single stage) regulator is good because one gauge measures the presure to the needle valves, and the other measures the pressure to the cylinder. That way you don't have to guess when the cylinder is about to go empty.

Don't buy a 2 gauge (dual stage) regulator as they are more expensive and not necessary.

Steve Pituch
 

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Hey Nikolay,

The reason I questioned the solenoid is that on the APD I recall only about four "CO2" poisonings. The first one I was able to figure out exactly what had happened. The person had a tight fitting hood on the tank. We know that oxygen is absorbed into the water at the surface. Put plastic wrap on the surface and the fish will suffocate. Also, oxygen will not be displaced in water by CO2.

Well the CO2 was slowly escaping from the water and into the trapped air above the water surface. This was pushing the oxygenated air out of the trapped air space. Pretty soon this air space was oxygen deficient. The fish actually died from suffocation from lack of oxygen, since none was being absorbed at the water surface.

Three of the four occurrences had tight fitting lids. The last person was an expert, and he said it was CO2 poisoning, so assumed he knew what was happening.

I happen to have open top tanks and high KH water. I just have the feeling that my pH will never get that low to cause higher CO2 and kill the fish. Thats why I dose the CO2 24/7, without a solenoid. I don't know about KH=2 water. That may be dangerous. I would always aim for a KH=5 or greater.

Also if you're using an in-line reactor the gas is only going to collect at the top of it. Since the power is out the pump won't be pushing CO2 enriched water into the tank. If you have a diffuser, the action of the CO2 bubbles will cause circulation in the water.

Regards,
Steve Pituch
 

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fishfry,

... and a needle valve. I single stage regulator does best at about 10 to 15 psi. To get the pressure lower for a low pressure device such as a diffuser, you need a needle valve, even for a single tank. Go to www.Clippard.com at look at the MNV-4K2. for $11. As I said before you don't need a solenoid, as most people run their CO2 24/7.

Steve
 
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