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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello here,
I have a new 75gl tank and I would like to make it a live plant aquarium. So, I am looking around for a good CO2 system, I have a good budget to spend for it, so I wouldn't consider that an issue. I was looking into this system today and I would like any suggestions or thoughts:

http://www.aquariumplants.com/product_p/pr4026.htm

Do you think that would be too much for a 75gl tank? Also, I can see that the reactor there uses a pump (a Rio pump): will that make it noisy? I am asking that because I know there are other CO2 systems without pumps, so I was wondering if that's something really needed for my tank size or not. I am not expert in CO2 systems and I never got one! Any help and advice about this system and any other possible system is very, very welcome!

Thank you in advance.

Best,
Fabrizio
 

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You really don't need all that stuff. The ph controller is not at all necessary and it's another thing to worry about and setup and maintain. Just get the regulator (the one in the set or the one with the bubble counter), 5 or 10lb tank (depending on space) 5lb will probably last around 6mths between fills on a 75g and don't bother with that rio reactor. It's another bulky piece of equipment you don't need. Just get a glass diffusor for $10 - $15 and put it under your filter's spray bar. The ony other thing you need is a timer (like the one in the set) so the co2 goes off at night. That's it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you guys. Actually I liked the idea of the Ph controller so that I can have some control over the PH level as well the fact to avoid to check it manually everytime... what do you think about that detail?

Thank you again very much!

Fab.
 

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I think pH controllers are overrated as they measure the tank water, which generally has phosphates and other stuff that tends to buffer the pH, giving less than accurate readings. I prefer a drop checker for accuracy and a timer to shut off CO2 at night when it's not needed. Food for thought.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I understand. Another question: is it true that a PH controller helps to avoid waste of CO2? Also, is there any risk, without an automatic controller, to have water too acidic because of too much CO2?

Thank you.

Fab.
 

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using a co2 controller to not waste co2 is not a very good reason to invest in one. The amount of co2 that would be saved will not even come close to cover the price of the controller. If you want to speed money get a digital co2 monitor.
 

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CO2 doesn't drop the pH enough to damage fish or plants. Too much CO2 is hard on the fish, but not because it lowers the pH. A pH controller can actually result in losing fish. If the controller fails to work properly, you will add too much CO2 to the tank and the CO2 will kill the fish. In my opinion they are a waste of money, and a detriment to keeping a good healthy aquarium.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What about the possibility (if any of course!) to go away from home for several days and too much CO2 is pumped inside the tank? Is that something could happen?

Thanks.
 

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If you set the regulator and needle valve to the bubble rate that gives you the amount of CO2 in the water that you want, it will remain that way until the CO2 tank runs out of liquid CO2 or until the solenoid fails, if you use one. But, if you use a pH controller you have to set the needle valve and regulator to give more than enough CO2, or the controller never does anything. Then if the controller or solenoid fails too much CO2 is supplied continuously to the tank, killing the fish. It is safer without the controller.
 

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I completely agree with Hoppy. I now use a solenoid and needle valve to shut off the CO2 at night. I also used to just run CO2 24/7 and I did not have any problems with my fish.
 

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As usual, I do not agree with anyone here.

Firstly. I have a pH controlled CO2 system and it is working great. For those people who say that CO2 doesn’t change you pH much let me point out that I am running a 4 gH, 2 kH tank and when I turn off the CO2 the pH goes to about 8.0 with CO2 "on" and CO2 at about 15 -20 ppm, the pH is 6.7. (facts not stuff off the top of my head).
If you are going to run a planted aquarium you will not want a lot of phosphates in your water anyway; so, they are not a problem with pH. Check you kH and PO4 regularly and get an extra hand held pH meter. The handheld and tank meter need to be calibrated regularly against reference solutions (which are an expense item along with an occasional new electrode).

There are some things about the AP system that I don’t like.
The reactor has to be in your tank and is big and ugly. Find one that works in-line. If you can switch to the AP.com “Best regulator in the world” do that. It can regulate the CO2 flow better.

Even with the AP.com system “as is” you will have way more control over your aquarium.
 

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In my personal experience, I have found that the simpler you can make it - the better.

I use a pressurized system with a 5 lb bottle, Milwaukee reg and a glass diffuser. I have a timer set for the Co2 to come on 30 minutes before the lights do and shut off when the lights shut off. Photoperiod is 10 hours a day - 5 on, 2 off, 5 on. I run at about 130 - 140 bpm, with a Co2 ppm of 24 - 28.

pH controller seems like overkill to me (from what I have read). But the great thing about this hobby is that there are many ways to get basically the same result and what works well for some, may not work as well for others.

I agree - experiment and find what is best for you.
 

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As usual, I do not agree with anyone here.

Firstly. I have a pH controlled CO2 system and it is working great. For those people who say that CO2 doesn't change you pH much let me point out that I am running a 4 gH, 2 kH tank and when I turn off the CO2 the pH goes to about 8.0 with CO2 "on" and CO2 at about 15 -20 ppm, the pH is 6.7. (facts not stuff off the top of my head).
If you are going to run a planted aquarium you will not want a lot of phosphates in your water anyway; so, they are not a problem with pH. Check you kH and PO4 regularly and get an extra hand held pH meter. The handheld and tank meter need to be calibrated regularly against reference solutions (which are an expense item along with an occasional new electrode).
There are some things about the AP system that I don't like.
The reactor has to be in your tank and is big and ugly. Find one that works in-line. If you can switch to the AP.com "Best regulator in the world" do that. It can regulate the CO2 flow better.

Even with the AP.com system "as is" you will have way more control over your aquarium.[/QUOTE


It's O.K. do disagree, but it is a FACT that a ph controller is not needed in planted aquaria. Your proof is right hear at APC. The majority of folks do not use them and have great success long-term as I have. IMO it is another device that needs to be setup, maintainted and could possiblly malfunction. It is safer and more reliable to simply have your co2 shut off at night via the solenoid that is included with most regulators. This way the fish are not at risk during the evening when the plants aren't using the co2. My co2 out of the tap is around 7.5 and drops to 6.5 during the later part of the day. In the morning the ph is somewhere inbetween. It is a myth that a change in ph itself is dangerous to fish. BTW - Most folks here do a 50% wc weekly, what do you think happens to the ph when you add the new water. I have never had a problem and as I stated my ph out of tap is 7.5 and my peak co2 ph is around 6.5.
 

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As usual, I do not agree with anyone here.

Firstly. I have a pH controlled CO2 system and it is working great. For those people who say that CO2 doesn't change you pH much let me point out that I am running a 4 gH, 2 kH tank and when I turn off the CO2 the pH goes to about 8.0 with CO2 "on" and CO2 at about 15 -20 ppm, the pH is 6.7. (facts not stuff off the top of my head).
If you are going to run a planted aquarium you will not want a lot of phosphates in your water anyway; so, they are not a problem with pH. Check you kH and PO4 regularly and get an extra hand held pH meter. The handheld and tank meter need to be calibrated regularly against reference solutions (which are an expense item along with an occasional new electrode).

There are some things about the AP system that I don't like.
The reactor has to be in your tank and is big and ugly. Find one that works in-line. If you can switch to the AP.com "Best regulator in the world" do that. It can regulate the CO2 flow better.

Even with the AP.com system "as is" you will have way more control over your aquarium.
It's ok ray, we don't agree with you either. :crazy:

Believe it or not there are a few pioneers and experts in the hobby that are on here, some of the best in the country(no I do not think I am one). We are not all idiots. With some listening and humility you might learn something.
 

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I have a 75 gal and dont use a pH controller. My water here is very soft and the softer the water and less alkalinity (KH) the lower the pH will run. I think a lot of members here forget what works in their tank won't in another because of the vastly different parameters water can have. You just need to regulate the CO2 flow properly. I also no longer use my solenoid as the pH fluctuated too much using it. Again, you need to balance the regulator and needle valve to achieve the desired level. I use a grounding probe in my tank and this renders a pH controller useless for correct readings. The amount of phosphate that you should have in your tank should not be an issue with pH devices. The drop checkers have the same issue with phosphate as a ph meter.

KIS = keep it simple. As Houseofcards and others said, its just another thing to keep up and another item that could break.
 

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I would advise everyone to take a looksie at previous posts and make his/her own best decision...haha ;) :roll:
Of course you can take anyone's advice but let me point out that none of the other people posting about pH controllers have one. (If they did they wouldn't make some of those laughably ignorant posts. Some of these people don't even know how the equipment works).

If anyone on this thread actually OWNS a pH controller and had a problem with it I would seriously like to hear about it.

BTW how do you get to the Jedi level of experience and not have a pH controller?
 
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