Aquatic Plant Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I just bought a new pH controler with solenoid. When the solenoid shuts down the gas flow, after a while the tube explodes in a big noise. It happend 4 times already with different kinds of CO2 tubes, I don't think that the problem is with the connections of the solenoid and the regulator because they remain attached, only the body of the tube erupts.

I don't know if the problem is the solenoid because it's working just fine, I never had this kind of problems before if someone has clue please...

Thanks...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,136 Posts
Do you have a pressure regulator ?
Is it working right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
It would be more helpful if you could describe or post a picture of your set up, but I would think that you have gas flowing down a line to a dead end where it's shut, so it just builds up in that area until KABOOM.

Tell us a bit more about your set up, so we could at least see if what I just said would be possible with how your equipment might be connected.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Hi,
Here's an overall view:



The section that explode was between the regulator and solenoid.
I might add that the regulator and solenoid seem to work just fine.
Here's a close up:

The tube go from the regulator:



The exploded part:



The tube continues into the solenoid:



Thank you for all your help...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
That looks like a single stage high pressure regulator. Most CO2 plant setups are dual stage, with the output set to 15psi or so.

That is my guess at what is going on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Maybe I'm off here, since I don't own a solenoid, and have never set one up, but wouldn't it make more sense if it was before the regulator? Or even connected directly (Not with tubing, like by a bolt). Because now you are letting the normal amount of air flow constantly, and then suddenly not be able to go anywhere (The closed solenoid). So, the gas just builds up until it causes too much pressure on the tubing, and makes it blow.

Have you had this setup working before, and its just sudden, or is this newly setup?

Here are some pictures of regulators with solenoids. You'll see that none of them have tubing in between the two.

http://www.betterthannature.com/catalog/product_info.php?currency=USD&products_id=323

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/produ...ubref=AA&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=0014050000000

http://www.seaquestmarine.com/JBJ_CO2_Solenoid_Regulator_p/jbj_co2reg.htm

Check if there are other ways to connect your two.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,136 Posts
I have my solenoid after the regulaor and needle valve and I have never had issues with the tube exploding. Seems like you have bad tubing and maybe wrong type. Get some CO2 resistant tubing.

How much pressure do you have the regulator set for?
Are you gauges working properly?
I dont see any needle valve.

50% of all gauges are inaccurate, the other 50% are broken.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
What is shutting the tank off? If the tank is still releasing CO2 then, as CSAXE21 said, the pressure will build up and blow every time. The solenoid is usually on the tank and when it shuts down it normally stops the flow of gas from the tank. You have it so that it shuts it down down the tube which does not stop the CO2 coming from the tank, only in the hose. think of it like this, if you turn off a garden hose at the tap the water stops flowing through the hose and there is no more pressure in the hose, but if you don't turn the water hose off at the tap and just kink the water will stop flowing but the water pressure will keep building up until the kink in the hose. Of course a water hose is much stronger so it can take the pressure, unlike the CO2 tubing. So short answer, you have it set up wrong. Take a look at the links in the previous post to see how it should be set up. Just attach the solenoid on the regulator where you currently have the tube connected and the problem will be solved.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,540 Posts
I think your solenoid needs to be right beside your regulator. You have all that Co2 coming out with no where to go and the air tubing eventually pops.

Why not call GreenLeaf Aquatics and find out. They are one of our sponsors. Orlando is great. He has helped me so much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
As was mentioned in a previous reply, you have a signle stage regulator that when opened, will give you the maximum output pressure coming out of the CO2 tank. In addition to the problem with the regulator, you are lacking a needle valve anywhere in the setup to further regulate the flow into your tank, usually after a solenoid.

As was mentioned previously, the solenoid shuts off the CO2 but doesn't cut it off at the CO2 tank. That leads to a buildup of pressure in the tubing and ultimately blows the tubing. From the looks of it, the tubing appears to be rigid tubing of some sort, which is the wrong type to be used altogether. That leads to the blown tubing that you are experiencing. CO2 resistant tubing is flexible and doesn't usually have this problem.

So, here's what I would do. Get a dual stage regulator and ditch the solenoid. Attach a needle valve directy to your regulator. Adjust the main regulator to 15-20 psi and then adjust the bubble output until an appropriate pH is obtain based on the buffering capacity of your tank so you get a CO2 saturation around 30ppm. I used to use solenoids, but removed them from my regulators and all my plants seem to flourish just fine. Good luck resolving the problem.

Texex94
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
First of all thanks everybody for your quick reply.

I think that the source of the problem is- A. The tubing
B. The regulator without the needle valve.

this is my regulator:
http://www.myfishforum.com/aquarium...7-wts-2nd-hand-ista-co2-manual-regulator.html

and has I understood the single valve functions like a needle valve.
I'm using this regulator for almost 3 years now and it's ok, but I never used it with a solenoid before.

I might add that my tank is a little bit long (1.8m) and I'm using two internal reactors. So I need a pH controller and a solenoid to maintain a constant pH level, for discus and other fish.

My question is, do I need to replace the regulator or just the CO2 tube?

Thanks again,
Guy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
my suggestion is to replace the regulator with a two stage regulator, get a needle valve, change to co2 resistant tubing. and if you choose to retain the solenoid, i think it should go before the needle valve. this will prevent the tubing blowout.

if you place the reactor to the output of your filter, you won't need two reactors. and it'll reduce the amount of equipment in your tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
GB makes a fitting that connects between your regulator and your solenoid so that you are not putting high pressure through the hose all the time. Run your tubing from the regulator to your bubble counter. Try to keep you regulator set below 15psi and use tubing rated for CO2.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
the solenoid needs to be directly connected to the regulator. The hose can't handle that kind of pressure when the solenoid shuts off, thats why they are attached directly to the reg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
First of all I want to thank everybody for your help.

After reading your replies I have found the missinig part of the pazle. The lack of a needle valve seems to be the problem. I never used a solenoid without a needle valve and never had this kind of problems.

So I rushed to my supplier and bought a new regulator with a built in solenoid.

Problem solved...

Thanks,
Guy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
I would blow through the co2 tubing to see if air comes out the other end. And the other side of tube that connected to the diffuser and also that solenoid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
the solenoid needs to be directly connected to the regulator. The hose can't handle that kind of pressure when the solenoid shuts off, thats why they are attached directly to the reg.
I agree here!!! Mine has the Solenoid attached directly to the Regulator!! Never had this problem.

You will always have this problem the way you have it, PRESSURE is PRESSURE, with or without a needle valve. All the needle valve is going to do is allow you to control the flow, not the pressure. Even with a needle valve, if you shut off the solenoid, eventually the pressure will build to whatever you tank regulator is letting out.

g

PS. If you take a look at any of the pictures on the net for Gauge and Solenoids, they are show it attached to the regulator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,136 Posts
Sounds to me like the regulator isnt working/broken or the pressure is too high. My regualtor is set for 1.5 psig and then thru a needle valve. I have about six inches of hose before the solenoid and never had a problem. When the solenoid shuts off my regulator holds the pressure steady.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
Sounds to me like the regulator isnt working/broken or the pressure is too high. My regualtor is set for 1.5 psig and then thru a needle valve. I have about six inches of hose before the solenoid and never had a problem. When the solenoid shuts off my regulator holds the pressure steady.
Ya, that would work if you are only set at 1.5 psi, but not if you were set at 15 psi.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
926 Posts
Right - unless you have a regulator that steps pressure down to <200PSI (actually, I think most of use use <10PSI working pressure), your solenoid will eventually see too much pressure and fail, even if it's bolted to the regulator. Solenoids are typically rated for a couple hundred PSI, at most. Without that second stage giving you a nice, low working head pressure, no needle valve or solenoid will last as the head pressure will build to that of the tank (somewhere between 700-800PSI). Even if the needle valve were between the regulator and solenoid, the pressure on the solenoid will build up to whatever the regulator is allowing (will just get there a little slower w/ needle valve in place).
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top