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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Did everyone give up on the native plants? Lately no ones putting up pics or stories. Come on folks, I've found much better plants in roadside ditches than I've ever seen in a fish shop.
 

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This labor day weekend I am going on a trip to the frio river here in texas, then next month I will be going to the guadalupe river here too. I am hoping to find at least a few different texas native plants on these trips. If so, I'll have lots of pics and stories. :)
 

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OK, here are a few photos of progress of some of my "collected" plants.

This is some local emersed Bacopa monnieri that just flowered.


This is from the San Marcos expedition that I went on with Paul Krombholz (HeyPK). It is one strand of Zosterella dubia. The other fronds are very small and have not taken off yet.


This is a yet unidentified species of Potamogeton found in the San Marcos River.


This is some "American" Cyptocoryne becketti from the expedition. After it melted I put it in this 3 liter bottle and sealed it up. This is the progress 2 months later.

Regards,
Steve Pituch
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
native plants

Spituch, the pics are amazing. Dont forget me when the american cryts are ready to share. I'll be glad to send you whatever you want(that I got)..Jimjim
 

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Steve, your Potamogeton looks awfully like P. wrightii. It grows ultra fast and pearls very nicely.
Jim, I'm all about collecting native plants. However, where I live, there isn't much to find. New houses are always popping up covering old ditches /rivers. Sometimes I wish I lived in the countries.
 

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Magnus,

I can't find any references to P. wrighti in the USA. Its not in Fasset, but the picture in Kasselmann looks pretty close. Is it an introduced plant were you live?

On mine the internodes are very long. In Fasset it looks a little bit like P. pulcher, but it is a very old book, the name may have changed. It could have been intoduced to the San Marcos River. We have learned that there was an aquatic plant nursery in the river during the sixties and seventies. That's how the becketti that they are trying to eradicate got introduced.

Regards,
Steve Pituch
 

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Steve,
I also couldn't find anything about P. wrightii growing in U.S. My best guess, you have suggested, is that this plant was introduced in the region near San Marcos. Other than that, I would have to turn to you for information.
I got this plant from Error so maybe he can elaborate upon its source. It grows just like your descriptions. The internodes are very far apart from each other, and it grows extremely fast. New growths are semi-transparent. If you would like, I can try to post a picture for better confirmation.
This San Marcos River seems to be the hot bed for plants, Steve. How often do you visit this "store"?
 

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Magnus,

Paul Krombholz and I were only there once. It is one of many aquifer fed rivers at a constant 72degF year round. Its about three hours away. The trip takes about 6 to 7 hours by canoe.

I am actually considering going to another similar river in the same general vicinity.

Steve Pituch
 

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Steve,

Does it look anything like this:
 

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Error,

Well its close. Mine is swaying in the current. No way would it grow up straight in the aquarium, the stem is too slender. It looks most like the weaker stem on the far right. Color is more a yellowish green. I'm betting mine is local. I think HeyPK had an idea of what it was. Paul where are you?

I sent a piece to Phil Edwards, and it didn't survive the trip, so it doesn't ship well.

What puzzles me is that its not in any of the on-line databases.

Steve
 

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The weaker stem on the far right is just closer the rear wall of the aquarium. It is the same plant.

Might it be Potamogeton natans?
 

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Error,
I think that after looking online at more databases, it may be best to just call it a Potamogeton species, or Potamogeton (San Marcos). The following page alone had a ton on Potamogetons
http://www.botany.wisc.edu/wisflora/scripts/SearchResults.asp?Genus=Potamogeton
It probably beter to just enjoy it. Can you imagine if we gave a botanist all our ID questions? We would keep him busy for a lifetime.

Steve Pituch
 

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The plants in cultivation as P. malaianus are actually P. wrightii. The real P. malaianus is a synonym of P. nodosus, which is probably closer to what you have, since you collected it wild. It is difficult to say for sure without floating leaves or flowers.
 

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It looks like Potamogeton malaianus is from the Far East. If it is not native to the San Marcos River it would have been probably introduced in the 1960s or 70s. It seems unlikely.

Error,
P. nodosus does grow in Texas. It seems to be the best fit so far. It is grown to the surface. It would be nice if I could get it to produce those big floating leaves.

Error, where did you get this information? (I'm envious :cry: )

Steve Pituch
 

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I'd tell you, but I'd have to kill you :)

That little tidbit is from the P. wrightii entry in Kasselmann, actually.

I get most of my information from the various plant databases online. A simple search for a species name on Google will often reveal a great deal of information, and their image search feature is nothing to scoff at. The USDA Plants database in particular is a decent tool with which to determine species distribution.

If I find a good site, I often bookmark it and keep it for future reference. Saves a lot of headaches.

Potamogeton nodosus:
 

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HI Error,
OK, I missed the reference under P. Wrightii in Kasselmann. Thanks. I just noticed a fruit on one of them, still green. It is under water and I don't know if I cut that stem and replanted it, pulling the fruit under water or it actually grows submerged. What has surprised me is that even though parts of it are floating I haven't gotten any of those wide shiny leaves yet.



Yes, that is a very nice drawing, much nicer than what I see in the Fassett book.

Steve Pituch
 

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Error,

I got another picture of a flower today. It appears that when a flower is to form three leaves form at a node. The center leaf covers the flower. Eventually the center leaf grows a stem and pulls away from the fruit. The only thing that hasn't happened is the formation of the floating leaf form like in your drawing.


Regards,
Steve Pituch
 
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