Aquatic Plant Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,448 Posts
I wouldn't recommend that. How much ammonia and urea might be there? Root tabs are not that expensive, and you really do not need to use them except for a few circumstances, imo, so why chance it? :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,865 Posts
I wouldn't. That's asking for a huge ammonia spike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,332 Posts
Have an overabundance of something there in Australia do you? ;)

Like the others said, why bother. There are many safer, and easier ways to accomplish the same thing.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,429 Posts
I think I see one inventive business plan going down the drain now!

Could it be possible to mineralize those natural pellets similar to what we do with soils? (That could get the business plan up and running again!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
429 Posts
That really isn't a bad idea. I mean if you could mineralize it like hoppy mentioned, then you could have premade fert balls. This has got me thinking of other types of poo you could use like rabbit poo. Good thinking duzzy. Just when you or someone figures out how to make them useable, let us know too. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Hi there thanks all,

firstly there is a guy in Australia that works at melbourne zoo and he uses elephant poo to grow beautiful tanks of plants. Also what is mineralizing them mean?

and mate you would not believe the livestock we have down here lol
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,429 Posts
About that livestock.....I have a problem seeing a market for mineralized cow poo.

"Mineralizing" means converting the organic nitrogen or ammonia and urea in the substance to inorganic nitrogen, like KNO3. With soils you basically keep it wet for a few days, then dry it in the sun. It's a bit more complicated, but that is the basic principle.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,429 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,865 Posts
Hi hoppycalf,

so if I soak it then dry it in the sun would that do it?

Regards Darren
Your neighbors will love you. :D

Yes, that's what I would do if I were going to try it. Repeat the soaking and drying several times as hoppy already suggested. I would suggest trying it on a smaller tank to start with. It's always easier to restart a smaller tank than a larger one if need be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,700 Posts
I would say, keep it damp, not wet, for a few days. If you soak and rinse, you wash out the soluble nutrients, whether the nitrogen is in the form of ammonia or nitrate. Damp is better than wet because more air spaces exist within the pellet, and oxygen diffuses through air somewhere around 100,000 times faster than it does through water. If wet, much of the interior of the pellet would be filled with water and would be anaerobic, keeping any nitrogen as ammonia. The bacteria that oxidize ammonia to nitrate need oxygen.

I do not see any benefit from drying the soil, goat pellets, or whatever. I have noticed that fully dried soil often has a huge bloom of bacterial activity when water is added, but not soil that has been kept damp. I am not sure what all those bacteria are growing on, but it might be that drying kills a lot of bacteria and/or other organisms in the soil, and the bacterial growth may be on all the dead organisms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Hi Hoppycalf,

that doesn't inspire much confidence lol Tom Barr was telling me of one of the greatest crypt growers in the world uses poo and a mates mate here in Australia works at Melbourne zoo and he uses elephant poo in his tank.

I will do the test though, thank you for your help

also wouldn't soaking it leach some of the goodness out?

Regards Darren
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,429 Posts
No doubt soaking will leach some of the ammonia and urea out of the pellets, so I agree with HeyPK that keeping them damp rather than in water would more likely work well. The first time I used river silt as a lower level of my substrate I only soaked it for a few days, and only one time, then dumped the water and used the silt wet. My aquarium smelled very bad for a few days after I filled it, but the smell did go away. So, I assume I still had ammonia when I started using it.

Since you want to poke the pellets into the substrate, where they will be covered with the substrate, some ammonia and urea probably won't do any harm. The real problems show up if you later expose one of them to the water above the substrate. That is a great way to learn about green water and try out the many methods for getting rid of it.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top