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Discussion Starter #1
When Roy mentioned in his thread how he had tried so many things to kill cyanobacteria in his emersed set ups, I really wanted to consider other options since chemicals and antibiotics are hardly ideal.

I got to thinking about biological means solely because some of my outdoor plants were attacked by Spotted Cucumber beetles this year doing some real damage. The last thing I want to do is go spraying something, and many do because those suckers are trouble since they spread disease and larvae can do tremendous damage quickly. One method of control involves biological warfare on larvae as well as toxicity of some microbial byproducts to adults. Some bacillus species (B. subtilis and B. thuringiensis are good examples) show pretty good efficacy against these bugs.

So I wondered what the google would tell me about their effects on cyanobacteria

......and wouldn't you know it: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/256588570_Bacillus_volatiles_antagonize_cyanobacteria

Hydroponic farmers have been using various strains for awhile, so its only natural to assume that one could find some locally. I got a couple of free sample bottles containing numerous strains of microorganisms and added them to a couple of trays a few days ago, but at a lower concentration than instructions suggest. I also added it to an aquarium just to see lol.

I'll be monitoring the trays and aquarium over the new few weeks to see what, if anything changes. I'll snap a pic of one of the trays as of now, and the list of microbes found in the products in just a bit.

Adam

https://www.microbelifehydro.com/products/hydroponics/natural-and-organic/foliar-spray-and-root-dip/

https://www.microbelifehydro.com/pr...d-organic/vegetable-and-fruit-yield-enhancer/
 

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From the pictures you uploaded, I think you're water is wayy too high; especially for H.C. I've only ever had issues with cyano when the water level was the same height +/- 0.5 inch of the soil.

You should be able to easily pull off most of the cyano as it'll come apart in strips/sheets, but all you need to do is lower your water level and you won't have this issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Some bins (even with the same species) do not develop cyanobacteria under the same conditions. If water level were the cause, then it should be systemic to any bin with that water level.

Also, these bins only have about 1/2" of substrate and the water volume is quite limited. I've had them dry out quickly if lids are left off for more than a day.
 

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I find it almost impossible to keep the water level below the substrate here in Colorado because the humidity is so low. Things just dry out too quickly.
 

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I have not had issues with cyo0 on fresh water yet but have been fighting it for years in salt water aquariums.

The two keys I found from my research and experience that seemed to work the best are:

1./ Phosphate level the higher the phosphates the more cyno bacteria feeds off the phosphates.

2./ The spectrum of the lighting. Cyno bacteria needs light in the range of 680nm to if you can reduce the amount of light at 680 nm (deep red) the cyco bacteria diminishes. Whit fresh water tanks some people supplement the red light with red LED for added Plant growth. But using 620 nm LED's should be used rather the 680 nm LED's. With other light sources check the spectrum data for the bulbs your using and if the red spectrum is peaking around 680 nm look for a source that peaks closer to the 620 nm in the reds.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It's been 4 days since i added the microbes and there seems to be a decrease in the cyanobacteria in several bins. Could be coincidental.

 

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very interesting! Please keep us updated with this. I've found that water level doesn't really affect cyano. My emersed setups with just moist turface (no water level) would develop cyano after about 5-9 months.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Oh boy, I completely forgot about the thread once the cyano won lol. At first it seemed to retreat, but over a couple weeks it returned.

I made a compost tea using some of the bacteria and used it as a foliar spray on plants with several pest bugs. It killed several species including thrips and fungus gnats.

I just added it to a system with cyano so I'll watch to see what happens there
 

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I have been working on a secret concoction which has worked very well for fungus but dont have any cyano so Im not sure but I would imagine it would work on it as well. Better yet is its ok to get on your hands. I could send you some if interested to try on the cyano.
 

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@nilocg
I'd be interested in trying/purchasing some from you. I always get BGA in my emersed setups and so far the only way I've been able to deal with is it to remove the top layers of infected substrate.
 

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so after a few years of keeping emergent setups, I've noticed that one of my tanks always succumbs to bga eventually. Albeit it might be because the cuttings that I transfer over have renmant bits of it, but I've seen it pop up in areas where none of my old plants were planted. Whenever I end up redoing my emersed tanks, the tank is always completely washed and wiped clean. I'll probably do a diluted bleach clean this time around. Anyways the main point of this post was that I noticed that my hydroponic setups have 0 problems with bga. You'd think that containers with hydroton bathed in nutrient rich solution would be breeding grounds for bga but surprisingly I've yet to see ANY bga. I've even transplanted plants/cuttings from the tank that always comes down with bga and it's been fine.
 
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