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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been growing the Cyrptocoryne nurii var "Pahang Mutated" since early this year when I got a small rhizome from another SFBAAPs member. He of course, got it from Joshua who collected them in the wild;
http://natureye.com/journeys/the-bloomy-affinis-and-the-mutated-nurii.html

As of this month, I was able to harvest my first plant, and give it to another SFBAAPs member. So it has taken 8 months to grow out a couple runners. Though, now that the roots are established, the rest of the grove should fill in nicely.

So there was some buzz over this plant earlier this year. Why you say?
Well because it is one of the prettiest crypts you could ever put in your tank...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Cyrptocoryne nurii var "Pahang Mutated"

This is an update of how this plant is doing. When I first posted this thread last October, the plant had been growing for me for about 8 months and was just barely throwing up its first plantlet. In the 7 or so months since then the plant has really taken off. So it takes some time to put down it's root structure, but after that it has a moderate growth rate.

Once there were plenty of plantlets, I transfered some of them to my emersed set-up and those plants are holding the pink veination. When the emersed plants, have plantlets themselves, I will move those back to a submersed set-up. I am curious about how well it transitions, as well as making sure the pink veination is stable.

This plant also threw up a spathe for me last December. It was after that, that the plantlets started popping up everywhere.

Here are a few pics. I realize that the Nurii is not the focus of some of them. However, they were pics I had handy that I thought still showed the nice colors for this crypt, as well as showing that it in fact does make a nice back drop to a lof of other plants. A little bit of pink to complement the stems, without overpowering them.





























The nurii is also shown briefly at the begining of this video:
and the end of this one:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks ;-)

Here is another small update:

I let this tank get a little overgrown (a reminder of why I avoid stem plants).


So I took out most of the stems and gave em away at the last SFBAAPS plant swap.


The nurii was looking a little pale, but a week later the color has recovered.


A few folks have asked me about getting one of these, so I am going ahead and putting a listing in the for trade forum.
 

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Wow, that is some dense growth on the C. parva!

Can I ask what your substrate is in this tank? The crypts are practically bustin' out at the seams.

And that C. nurii var "Pahang Mutated" is very pretty. When you said it looked pale, what do you think the cause was? Nutrient competition w/ the stem plants?

Interesting thread.
-Jane
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
For you information, the natural habitat may has gone now.
Ugh, every time I hear of destroyed habitats it seems those darn palm oil plantations are the cause. Lets, hope that some of it survived. Otherwise we are only left with your pictures and the few plants that are growing in cultivation.

Can I ask what your substrate is in this tank?
The tank has Aquasoil Amazonia (1). I also used powersand, though of course that was not necesary, I just wanted to try it. The tank has been growing for almost 3 years, in that time I have never replanted the parva. IMO, Parva is a one of the best possible forground plants. If you have patience to let is grow. It took over a year for that parva too fill in enough to look good. Now it is so dense I can pull out a hundred plants and you would never even notice it.

When you said it looked pale, what do you think the cause was?
Yes, this tank was designed as a low maintenace mostly crypt tank. With stem plants though, I have to dose a bit more. So the paleness could be due to like blockage (not usually an issue with crypts) or nutrient competition. Specifically, micros IMO. When there are no stems, the tank needs almost no ferts, stays algae free, and the crypts and moss pearls every day.
This video shows that pearling/streaming:

what is the large one in the back of the tank?
Good question. I purchased the plant as Cryptocoyne retrospiralis. When I got it, and tried to do an ID, I had thought that is was maybe C spiralis var "balansae" or something else in the group. I was unable to confirm, so I keep it as the name I bought it under (C. retrospiralis). It is almost certainly something else in the Crispulata group.
 

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I love c.Nurii. I just got an emmersed plant from GG and it completely melted to the roots and a bit of the rhizome (if that's what it's called on crypts). I really hope it comes back but Im sure I won't know for quite some time.

How did your plants take the changer from emmersed to submersed?
 

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The plant I got from zezmo (John) in July has been doing well. In fact, I now have four or five additional plants that are medium-sized and three or four small ones that have popped up in the last four months. They are planted in sand plus mud, made by mixing topsoil from my back yard with water to get a soupy mix, filtering it through a rice strainer, and mixing it with silica sand. They have developed a nice orange color. They don't look like the original 'mutated' form, which had white veins. I wonder if that was really a mutation or just a nutrient deficiency. The picture is a little foggy because I needed to scrape the glass, but couldn't find a razor blade.
 

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Was that from an emmersed Nurii PK? The tank my harder to find crypts is in has Ada as substrate and I dose micros weekly or bi-weekly after a WC. No co2. I'm pretty convinced after looking through all of jungle mikes fantastic threads that co2 isn't necessary (just speed growth a lot), just a healthy substrate and some good micros. Would you agree?
 

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This is a picture of the 'mutated' C. nurii taken by Joshua, the original collector of the strain that came to the U.S. I don't know if the plants that got to us came from underwater or above water, but from all the pictures, it looks as though these crypts spend a good part of the time underwater, and some of them are underwater all the time. Joshua's account can be read here. This natureye.com site has a lot of good articles and pictures of Crypts. All crypt enthusiasts should read these articles. There is an especially good one about substrates for the local crypts here.

 

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This is a picture of the 'mutated' C. nurii taken by Joshua, the original collector of the strain that came to the U.S. I don't know if the plants that got to us came from underwater or above water, but from all the pictures, it looks as though these crypts spend a good part of the time underwater, and some of them are underwater all the time. Joshua's account can be read here. This natureye.com site has a lot of good articles and pictures of Crypts. All crypt enthusiasts should read these articles. There is an especially good one about substrates for the local crypts here.

Very nice, thanks PK. But what do you think about my thinking on the Co2 in a crypt tank?
 

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About CO2: Yes, additional CO2 does speed growth a lot. If you don't add additional CO2, crypts seem to do better in lower light than they do in higher light. With additional CO2, it is just the opposite. In fact, I have seen high CO2 and low light situations cause severe melting in submersed crypts. From the numerous pictures by Jungle Mike and others, it seems that most submersed crypts are in moving water, rather than still water. Moving water improves CO2 and nutrient uptake compared to still water. Crypts in swamps may have slowly moving water, but the large amount of decaying leaves probably increases CO2 content, considerably. Also, crypts in ditches and small streams may be in water, a large part of which has recently seeped out from the soil and therefore will be high in CO2 and nutrients, especially iron and manganese. This picture shows water seeping into a ditch from the soil, and you can see the high iron content.
 

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This is a picture of the 'mutated' C. nurii taken by Joshua, the original collector of the strain that came to the U.S. I don't know if the plants that got to us came from underwater or above water, but from all the pictures, it looks as though these crypts spend a good part of the time underwater, and some of them are underwater all the time. Joshua's account can be read here. This natureye.com site has a lot of good articles and pictures of Crypts. All crypt enthusiasts should read these articles. There is an especially good one about substrates for the local crypts here.

tried this plant before. in my emersed setup, the leaves changed into green just like the others
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The plant I started with had white veination on what was left of the melting leaves. Since then it has grown submersed, under high light and CO2. It maintains a nice pink veination, aparently as do other nurii samples from this region. So while it does not quite look the same as the wild pics. It still has a firm "chain of custody" back to them.

On a side note, the plant is shown in a Newspaper article that was published today.

http://www.mercurynews.com/home-garden/ci_17218402
 
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