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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I 'm trying to understand what emersed implies. I am not asking about a leaf or flower growing above the surface but trying to better understand the care needed.
Actually I wanted to grow a Java fern emersed. I took a sprig and placed it on some wet coconut fiber and it immediately dried out. Following up I tried another couple of sprigs. one on a floating limb in one of my tanks and some in a small tank, bottom covered in some pond clay and water covering that by about 1/2 inch. Of course I put a glass cover on it to increase the humidity.
So far the plants in the tank look great. It did look like the plant on the limb dried out but it is hanging on and may come back. My sword plants in my ponds do great emersed.
I see adds that a plant has been grown emersed or submerged but never the relative humidity of plants growing emersed and from the examples I showed above I think this might be very important.
I may be just beating a dead horse but what does everyone else think?:decision:
 

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I've never set up any emersed type set ups, but from what I have read of others, it is essential you maintain very high humidity levels in order to be successful at it.
 

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Very high humidity levels are very important whenever you are trying to transition plants from submersed to emersed form. The easiest setup is an empty aquarium with a glass lid that almost fully covers the top. Use small 3" pots filled with the substrate of your choice to put the plants in. Then fill the tank with water such that the water level is about half-way up the sides of the pots. Fertilize the water and the plants should begin to grow. A small powerhead for circulation works well.
 

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Initially, its best to have really high humidity. When you're transitioning stuff to emersed growth, yu can do one of the following:

Plant it and keep it basted and/or the humidity really high.

- or-

Lay a stem/plant in shallow water and allow it to grow up and out on its own.

After things are established, the humidity doesn't always have to be so high. Some won't flower or even grow into their typical emersed forms that way. Hygrophila difformis counts for both of those things. Some experimentation is often necessary, but it's never usually that hard.
 

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I´ve grown plants emersed once.

As the others already have mentioned it´s important to keep the humidity high. And I want to add that how well it goes also depends on what kind of plant there is.

When I experimented I used 50% soil as in the kind one uses to pot flowers in, 25% laterite and 25% perlite and that soilmix I just barely covered with tapwater. The plants I tried out were Elocharis vivipara, Rotala wallichi and Vallisnera americana "Mini-twister". These plants were planted in a small bucket that I covered with a transparent plastic bag and placed in a window, soo the sun was the lightsource.

When I started my experiment it looked like this:


Four weeks later the Vallisneria was dead, the wallichii had formed a few new shots and the vivipara has started to spread.


I wish you good like with your experiments in growing aquatic plants emersed and I´m convinced that if I could managed to do it almost anyone can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you all for your answers. It seems I need much more water to start new growth but Aaron why do I need a powerhead for circulation? I would have thought changing the water would be enough. George
 

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I have a soil-based tank that I let dry out and never got around to cleaning up. After ignoring it for a few months, I saw a leaf poking up from the mess of dried vegetation and gunk.

The leaf turned out to be a H. polysperma that had somehow survived the drought and had adjusted. That plant is now several, and has been joined by a C. wendtii that also is a survivor. There is also a good growth of algae on the substrate.

Those plants have been growing emersed for about 5 months. Every now and then I spray them, and 2 or 3 times I have moistened the substrate, although not much.

The humidity in the tank equals that of the air around it - mainly in the 50's and 60's. Temperature at this time of year is in the 60's.

Bill
 

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I ripped out a bunch of rotala, ludwigia repens and bacopa monneri and stuck them in a planter outside. I just made sure that there was about 1/2 in. of water covering the surface. They sprouted very quick and I now keep them in my house in the window sill. So I guess that it would depend on the type of plant.

Scouter
 

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It depends on the plant. There are some plants that do not dry out in dry air. Bacopa monnieri, Lysimachia, various hygrophila, all I have growing emersed in open top containers with no intentionaly raised humidity. In a small room with several aquariums or containers of water, the humidity level is probably a little higher than normal. I can keep some anubias under the same conditions, but some Anubias also have had the edges of their leaves dry out, so it seems border line for them. I could use a humidifier.
 
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