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That's just the way this plant is --incredibly touchy and demanding.

In my experience, consistency is the key with this species. When did you decide to add the calcium chloride? Before or after the plant began to stunt? The sudden shift in water parameters might have adversely effected it.

All your dosing levels seem fine (how much does 0.4tsp add to your size tank in ppm?).

In my experience, once this plant stunts, it takes a really long time to recover and put out healthy new growth (weeks!).

Carlos
 

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Actually, Oriental Aquariums grows this plant submersed. The bright red stem and leaves are all submersed growth.

Emersed growth is very different looking --leaves are rounder and mint green. The stem is cherry red and considerably thinner.

Carlos
 

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I can grow it, just not as a well as I'd like without really trying, submersed.

I've looked at the leaves Carlos, why doesn't it have any epiphytes and every other plant that is grown submersed has?
Tom,

This plant is grown and produced by Oriental Aquariums submersed, period. They have fields of it growing underwater. There must be something to what they are doing with this plant. I am pretty familiar with the submersed growth form.

I didn't know that having flora and fauna coating the leaves is a requirement for being a submersed plant.

I have grown the plant emersed before and have received emersed cuttings from hobbyists. The morphology of the stems are very, very different. It actually adapts readily to submersed conditions with thickening stems and bright red leaves --typical of the Nesaea genus. It actually adapts at much the same rate as Ammania gracilis, Nesaea pedicellata, and Ludwigia brevipes (all compared next to each other) when drowned.

This plant also produces a massive root system for a stem plant. Lots of
healthy white roots.

It's very pretty when doing well. Kind of like a miniature, bright red Ammania with undulating leaves. I think it has a lot of potential for small planted aquariums. Maybe when planted aquarium horticulture continues to be more refined, it'll become more popular.

It's a shame that it is so slow to recover from stunting. It is the ultimate indicator plant.

Carlos
 
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