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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
Yup, you are correct. The bubbles produced from the mixture contains near pure CO2 gas that is readily dissolved in water. However, since DIY CO2 doesn't usually produce a high amount of bubbles the amount of CO2 dissolved isn't very high.

Because of the surfacing fish,

The problem could be:

1) Too much CO2 at night when lights are out. Plants and DIY CO2 producing CO2.

2) Too low O2 at night when lights are out. Plants no longer producing O2.

Suggestion: add airstone at night on a timer.

-John N.
 

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now instead of of all this yeast,suger, water businesses could one just get a co2 tank(like paint ball tanks) and a regulator and just stick a tube from that to the aquarium?
 

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
The Red Sea Paintball kit fits the the small paintball cylinders that are typically sold at paintball stores, and local Walmarts. People like this kit because space is limited, and the smaller refill cylinders are easier to obtain for them. Cost wise, this is more expensive by initial costs of $50, than say a normal full size regulator w/solenoid and a 5-10lb CO2 cylinder, as you have to purchase new small paintball cylinders more often and the redsea kit doesn't come with a solenoid.

There are other threads regarding Pressurized CO2 options (Paintball or full size setups) to continue this discussion on. Here's one to start regarding paintball and full size regulator options.

-John N.
 

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
ATM,

1. A 2 liter bottle is fine. The bigger the container the longer it will last. I wouldn't worry about injecting too much CO2 with DIY. I used a 2 liter bottle on my 1 gallon nano without any problems.

2. I suppose you can try to make a ladder, but I had good results using a glass diffuser from aqmagic.com. Or you can even use a sweetwater stone (aquaticeco.com), or just have the bubbles go directly into the intake of a filter.

-John N.
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
Ok thanks yes I read that and think I will try just disolving it via my intake tube, that doesn't make a lot of noise does it?

I was wondering when you make the bubble counter how does it measure the bubbles?

thanks
I don't hear much noise on mine. When it hits a large bubble you'll hear a swooshing sound ocassioanlly. Most of the bubbles that come off the glass diffuser or sweetwater airstone are pretty "misty" and usually don't make much noise when they hit the filter's impeller.

The bubble counter doesn't actually count bubbles. It enables you to count the bubbles as you see them go through the water. This helps you know how much CO2 is being produced, and whether or not it is slowing down and needs replacing. Generally with DIY CO2 and a 2 liter bottle I got about 1 bubble per 4 seconds, so I imagine you should be experience a similar CO2 output.

-John N.
 

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I don't hear much noise on mine. When it hits a large bubble you'll hear a swooshing sound ocassioanlly. Most of the bubbles that come off the glass diffuser or sweetwater airstone are pretty "misty" and usually don't make much noise when they hit the filter's impeller.

The bubble counter doesn't actually count bubbles. It enables you to count the bubbles as you see them go through the water. This helps you know how much CO2 is being produced, and whether or not it is slowing down and needs replacing. Generally with DIY CO2 and a 2 liter bottle I got about 1 bubble per 4 seconds, so I imagine you should be experience a similar CO2 output.

-John N.
I'm not sure on what you mean here, do you think you could explain how the bubble counter works? sorry I'm still new, setting it up tonight so maybe I'll see what you mean.

thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
No Problem. We'll see if I can explain the bubble counter a little better.



As you can see from your diagram above, the bubble counter syringe (which is filled with water) is positioned so that you can see the CO2 bubbles as it course through the tubing, through the liquid in the counter and to your filter intake. You literally count the bubbles as they go through this counter. Why? It will give you a general idea of what your DIY CO2 yeast mixture is producing per minute. For example, if you see 1 bubble going through the bubble counter each second, then you know that your mixture is producing very well. When it starts slowing down to 1 bubble every 10 seconds then you know you have to think about replacing the mixture. The bubble counter is an indicator of how much CO2 you are producing. 1 bubble every 4 seconds is typical of a DIY CO2 setup in my experience.

If you didn't have a bubble counter, then you wouldn't be able to visually see if your DIY CO2 is working as optimally as it can. So again, you are literally counting each bubble as it courses through the system.

-John N.
 

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This & similar threads inspired a science fair experiment idea...
As a result of the differences in receipes seen while researching DIY CO2, my daughter & I are doing a full factorial designed experiment (factors are yeast, sugar, water - 2 levels ea.). The goal is to be able to optimize for either output duration or output volume.

Results in a couple of weeks...
 

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The package said 2 and 1/4 teaspoons of yeast and I poured all of this in my bottle, is this going to harm anything or just going to give me a fast reacting co2?

Ok so the glue I used ended up being dissolved in the glue but I had already made the mixture so I have it now with the check valve but no bubble counter since I have two check valves. Could I use hot glue or elmers glue or should I let it be as it is and get expoxy glue asap though where would I buy it, many thanks.

currently waiting for bubbles to come
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
1) Towel sound like it will keep the bottle warm enough.

2) 2 1/4 tsp of yeast will make your reaction go super fast. Most likely will have to replace in about 1-2 weeks.

3) No bubble counter is fine. You can let it run as is, and feel the pressure in the bottle or observe the buuble output instead. However, if you do decide to make the counter, epoxy glue is what you'll want to use. Other glues don't work very well. Epoxy can be found at target, walmart, home depot in hardware sections for $3.

-John N.
 
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