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I was wondering if the classics have an adjustable flow. I plan on getting a cannister to replace my hang on filter soon, but if I do, give myself the option of a bigger filter in case I upgrade to a bigger tank in the future. So does it?

Regards,
Dennis
 

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I don't think the 2213 would be enough for a 60 gallon. You'd be better off with the 2217 or 2215 at least.
I keep both a 2217 and a seperate HOB running on my 55 gallon. It's always nice to have a backup. :)
 

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Most classic Eheims come with the ball valves, the Plus package come with valves, spray bar and media which is well worth it.

I've always used the valves on the classic canisters to regulate the flow, there is enough space between the impeller blades and housing that it won't effect the impeller in any way, even fully shut off the impeller will continue to spin. Only real risk of slowing it down too much is less cooling of the coils which rely on waterflow to disperse the heat. Even so I've had Eheims (2217) completely clog up for weeks without any damage to the impeller or motor, although the head of the filter was warmer than usual until I unclogged it.

If you do this it's best to limit the flow going from the canister back to the tank than the one bringing water to the filter.

Giancarlo
 

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You can adjust the flow from the classic series Eheims (2213,15,17) by using a clamp on the vinyl tubing on the output side. Eheim sells these clamps, but they are the same basic thing you can buy at the pond section of Home Depot or Lowes. The Quik-Disconnects you use with the Classic Series will leak if you try to regulate flow with them.

I use an Eheim clamp on a 2217 I have that is just a bit too much flow for the size tank.
 

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gpodio said:
Most classic Eheims come with the ball valves, the Plus package come with valves, spray bar and media which is well worth it.

I've always used the valves on the classic canisters to regulate the flow, there is enough space between the impeller blades and housing that it won't effect the impeller in any way, even fully shut off the impeller will continue to spin. Only real risk of slowing it down too much is less cooling of the coils which rely on waterflow to disperse the heat. Even so I've had Eheims (2217) completely clog up for weeks without any damage to the impeller or motor, although the head of the filter was warmer than usual until I unclogged it.

If you do this it's best to limit the flow going from the canister back to the tank than the one bringing water to the filter.

Giancarlo
I have also found this method to effectively control the flow rate for the classics!
 

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John P. said:
I know some people will disagree with Giancarlo, but I don't see why that won't work. Effectively you would be doing the same thing as running longer hose length.
You are restricting flow regardless of how you are doing it, built in valves, remote valves, long hoses, a brick resting on the tube.... Different methods to do the same thing.

Some pumps will even accept smaller impellers, Mag Drive pumps are one example, you can buy a larger model and use an impeller from a smaller unit to reduce flowrate.

Only thing one can argue about is to restrict intake tube or output tube. IMO it's always better to have the output restricted, this will avoid lower pressures inside the canister that would result in pulling gasses out of the water, making the canister burp and bubble most of the time with the potential risk of airlocking.

Giancarlo
 

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discusdave said:
You can adjust the flow from the classic series Eheims (2213,15,17) by using a clamp on the vinyl tubing on the output side. Eheim sells these clamps, but they are the same basic thing you can buy at the pond section of Home Depot or Lowes. The Quik-Disconnects you use with the Classic Series will leak if you try to regulate flow with them.

I use an Eheim clamp on a 2217 I have that is just a bit too much flow for the size tank.
Unless the clamp is between the valve and canister, faulty valves will still leak due to the increase in pressure. If your valves leak when you try this you either need to lube the o-rings or replace them. I lube all the o-rings once a year, haven't actually had to replace any o-rings in some years now, never a leak either. Use silicon lubricant or olive oil if you are in a jam. You'll be surprised how well the valves move and the quality of the seal when lubed.

Hope that helps
Giancarlo Podio
 
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