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Learn about he parasites' life cycles and treat accordingly. Some parasites spend part of their life in a form that is resistant to medications. It is not that they are overall resistant, or a stronger strain, just that you need to time the medications properly, depending on the parasite.
There is a parasite called Super Ich. Looks similar to Ich , but is not killed by the medicines that will generally kill the form of Ich that has been known for so long.

Here is an example, using Ich:
Ich burrows into the slime coat and cannot be affected by the common Ich meds when you see the spots on the fish.
The parasite falls off the fish and lands on the substrate. It can be affected then, not by medicines, but by vacuuming the tank. This can be quite difficult in a densely planted tank.
It reproduces, sending hundreds of swimming babies into the water. This is the phase when Ich can be killed by most meds, including salt and ultra violet sterilizers. The problem with UV sterilizers is that they depend on every bit of water from the tank circulating through the sterilizer frequently enough that the Ich organisms are killed before they can infest the fish. A UV sterilizer works well in a relatively bare tank.

The Ich life cycle is temperature dependent. At average tropical temperatures (mid 70sF) it can take about a week to go through the life cycle. To be sure you are getting all the Ich organisms you need to keep medicines in the tank for about 2 weeks, or at least 3 days beyond the day you saw the last Ich spot on a fish. Ich can hide in the gills, too. Any Ich med that says it can cure Ich in 3 days is not really telling the whole story. IF all the Ich babies emerged at the same time, then the medicine might be fine, kept at therapeutic levels for just 3 days. However, it is much more likely that you have Ich in every stage in your tank, some is just falling off the fish, some got embedded later and are not ready to fall off, some are in the free swimming stage, and not all go through their phases at exactly the same timing.
If your fish can handle warmer water (into the 80sF) the Ich life cycle can be shortened by a few days. Increase the aeration to raise the oxygen content of the water, and if the fish are still gasping lower the temperature back to the optimum level for the fish.
At pond temperatures Ich can last for several weeks or longer.

Most parasites have a life cycle that includes time in or on the fish, and time away from the fish. Any tank with fish that have parasites can be considered infested. Removing the fish to treat in a Q-tank does not rid the main tank of parasites, and the treated fish can just get re-infested when they are returned to the untreated tank.

Some medicines are deactivated if you use UV at the same time. (Especially if the label says to turn off the tank light)
Amquel Plus (maybe Amquel, too, I do not have a bottle to read) is not compatible with dye based meds often used for Ich and other parasites. (Read the label)
Do not combine medicines unless both packages are labeled as safe to use with each other. This includes salt.

Medicines that treat one group of problems may be useless for another group of problems, such as using antibiotics or fungicides to treat a parasite problem. Parasite meds in general will not kill every group of parasites, you need to know which parasite you are treating. Medicated food is a good way to treat if the fish are still eating.

Many bottom feeding fish (Loaches) are still wild caught, and can come to you with internal parasites. The stress of capture and transport can give the parasites the advantage. This is one reason to quarantine and treat all new fish before adding them to the main tank. Often the Q-tank is a bare bottom 10 gallon tank with just enough decor to make the fish feel safe. Makes UV sterilizer a good option, frequent vacuuming to remove fallen parasites is easy, medications are often labeled for 10 gallons worth of water, making dosing easy. If the fish are not responding you can clean out the tank and switch meds easily. Fish are easier to see, so you can watch their reactions to the medication and see if they are getting better.
 

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Sounds great. Yes, totally removing all fish from a tank for a short time will rid that tank of Ich. There are other parasites that do enter various dormant phases and could live through a fishless period, however.
By constantly moving Ich infested fish to new tanks you are escaping the Ich reproductive phase. No new Ich lands on the fish, so when the current white spots are gone that is the end of it. If you had only 2 tanks (not including the main tank), bare bottom, and alternated between them, rinsing well and drying the other tank daily might work. Having a third tank in the rotation would give you more time to run some form of disinfectant through the used tank, then deactivate it before reusing it for the fish, or a longer drying time between uses.

It is a concern also that Ich that used to respond to just about every treatment on the shelf (When done correctly) is now showing up that is not controlled by these meds.

Been a while since anyone had mentioned what you call the Sentinel Strategy. I did not know the name, but understand the concept. Works for relatively fast moving problems, but some people might get impatient at a long quarantine, and a disease or parasite with a long incubation period might not show up in the sentinel. For example, is a month long enough?
 
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