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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got the glass for my tank yesterday and got two holes drilled for the overflows, although I checked the fittings I still managed to get it wrong getting 25mm holes drilled when it turns out I actually require 28mm holes for the tank connectors. Is it possible to enlarge the hole without shattering the (now built) aquarium or a fitting with a thread which will fit comfortably in a 25mm hole without leaking?
 

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is this tempered glass? if so, then you're out of luck. you could then look at using a 25mm fitting and step it up from there to 28mm. otherwise i'm not sure what can be done.

if the glass is not tempered, you can just take it back and get the holes enlarged to the proper size you need.

good luck!
 

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I got a diamond wheel for my drill and was able to drill the hole a bit larger quite easily.
This was not tempered glass.
 

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A dremel with a tile cutting bit from lowes (~$13) is a much better way and more versatile overall, and perfect for your application. I can't remember the number, but this is what it looks like:





Cuts glass like butter and works like a charm.....it's part # 5665...or something like that. :rolleyes:

Check out Tacoshooter's description info starting at Post #10:

Drilling a Glass Aquarium-DIY-Major 56K Warning!

HTH
 

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Oh well, all the rest of us are a little richer by some glass working info, even if the OP has given up.

Does that tile drilling bit work also to enlarge a hole? I have not had much luck when using a drill bit in wood for this purpose. That is why I went straight to a grinding wheel sort of bit, rather than looking a glass/tile drill bits.
 

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Cutting glass is more like grinding, than drilling a hole in wood. Yes, the tile bit would work great for enlarging a hole. If you check out the last post of the thread that I linked to above.....the tile bit was used to cut a non-round-hole--if that makes sense.

It cuts glass like butter. Read through the thread. I started out the hard common way, but found a new better way thanx to Tacoshooter. The dremel/tile bit is completely superior....
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
i think the OP gave up on this thread. guessing at his post count, he hasn't returned to the forum.
I did actually! I'm on here all the time I just dont really post much!

Anyway I fixed the issue with a large peice of dowling wrapped in fine sand paper stuck in a drill on high speed, worked suprisingly although it took a while and didnt put any strain on the glass or cause scratches.
 

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Just my .02 here too.... I work with glass... I cut, grind, drill etc... (Basically I work glass like someone would work wood.)

The point I would like to make is that you do not "cut" or "drill" glass in the conventional way. Every method of working glass is actually a "grinding" of the glass.

THE SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT THING...... Is keeping you cutting, drilling or other operation from generating heat. When I do my work I have a water source constantly dripping. A diamond bit or a tile bit in a dremel will do wonders but you MUST keep the whole operation cool otherwise you will have disastrous results. I would just simply use a sopping wet sponge to drip water on your work area and KEEP IT WET. If you see any white powder while working, you are WAY too dry. I try to keep enough water moving across the work area to flush away the "white water" you create while grinding.

One more tip. if you need to make a round hole bigger, take a sharpie marker and mark the size you need. (Use something as a template). Work from the other side as Sharpie does not like to stick to glass. (But the blue ones DO for some crazy reason) When done, if you can't get the Sharpie off, Moisten a paper towel with a few drops of Laquer thinner, and it wipes right off.:wave:
 
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