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I just wanted to share my experience with the Hydra infestation and how easy it was to get under control in the end. In my case I can say for sure that the colony of Hydras appeared because I fed live baby brine shrimp and "flooded" the tank with those little creatures. Also I suspect that feeding frozen cyclops had something to do with it. I have only eight chili rasbora in my 10g tank, so the amount I fed was crazy.

I read through multiple forums, and decided not to even try any chemicals or try to get rid of them completely. I also have ramshorn-, bladder- and MT snails in the tank, along with ostracods. Ostracods where also multiplying like crazy.

I simply started to target feed the brine shrimp more carefully to my fish, letting just a few of them go at once and looked that those got eaten before adding more to the tank. I was careful to release the brine shrimp only to area where there were no Hydra. I also started to remove hydras from the glass manually using tweezers and small piece of sponge. I also cut off some plant leaves which were occupied by the hydra.

It took only two weeks and now there still are Hydra here and there (not a problem for me), but the numbers have gone down drastically. At the same time the excess ostracods started to diminish in numbers. Bladder snail numbers have gone down also.


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Bringing a different balance without the use of chemicals but by adjusting feeding, sounds great, thanks for the input!

For manual removal of hydra, I was successful using a relatively thin hose and siphoning them out like doing a water change. That of course means partial removal, but it was effective nonetheless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bringing a different balance without the use of chemicals but by adjusting feeding, sounds great, thanks for the input!

For manual removal of hydra, I was successful using a relatively thin hose and siphoning them out like doing a water change. That of course means partial removal, but it was effective nonetheless.
I tried removing hydra with a hose but decided use the sponge because some of the hydra just falled to the substrate and I was afraid for my shrimp babies 😁

The tweezer sponge combination works for me since the hydra seems to sink into the porous (not sure if this is the right word, sorry for my english) stucture.
 

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I had a similar experience. So many brine shrimp hatched from a mere 1/8 teaspoon of eggs that it was tempting to just throw the whole batch into the tank. To raise brine shrimp in controlled numbers, I would recommend small dishes or the brine shrimp hatchery setup described in my article on hatching brine shrimp eggs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I had a similar experience. So many brine shrimp hatched from a mere 1/8 teaspoon of eggs that it was tempting to just throw the whole batch into the tank. To raise brine shrimp in controlled numbers, I would recommend small dishes or the brine shrimp hatchery setup described in my article on hatching brine shrimp eggs.
I read your article and there was really good information. I bought the hatchery dish based on that 😊 I really like thw easiness of the system. Hatching rate is excellent with your instructions and with 98% hatchling rate brine shrimp.

The problem is like you said that, so tiny amount of eggs produce a lot of shrimp. And I have only 8 eaters 😅 I feed them 3-4 days from 1 patch, but the rest goes to waste.

For some reason I have not been able to preserve thw brine shrimp alive in freezer, even for over night 😕

I'd love to give more shrimp to my fish, since they seem to love eating them, and their colors really started to shine when eating those creatures..
 

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I read your article and there was really good information. I bought the hatchery dish based on that 😊 I really like thw easiness of the system. Hatching rate is excellent with your instructions and with 98% hatchling rate brine shrimp.

The problem is like you said that, so tiny amount of eggs produce a lot of shrimp. And I have only 8 eaters 😅 I feed them 3-4 days from 1 patch, but the rest goes to waste.

For some reason I have not been able to preserve thw brine shrimp alive in freezer, even for over night 😕

I'd love to give more shrimp to my fish, since they seem to love eating them, and their colors really started to shine when eating those creatures..
You can keep the brine shrimp a live in a 10 gallon tank with appropriate salinity. give it light to produce green water fro the shrimp to feed on. You can feed them spirulina and yeast.
 

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Quote: "For some reason I have not been able to preserve the brine shrimp alive in freezer, even for over night 😕"

I think you meant refrigerator. Freezing will kill them. You should be able to keep them alive for a few days by refrigerating them in a small amount of their salt water.

Glad the hatching is working out. Just a few moments ago, I was busy adding nauplii to my guppy tanks. Drives the fish crazy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You can keep the brine shrimp a live in a 10 gallon tank with appropriate salinity. give it light to produce green water fro the shrimp to feed on. You can feed them spirulina and yeast.
I have to test that someday, but don't currently have an extra tank and like I said only 8 small mouths to fees at a time 😊
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quote: "For some reason I have not been able to preserve the brine shrimp alive in freezer, even for over night 😕"

I think you meant refrigerator. Freezing will kill them. You should be able to keep them alive for a few days by refrigerating them in a small amount of their salt water.

Glad the hatching is working out. Just a few moments ago, I was busy adding nauplii to my guppy tanks. Drives the fish crazy!
Yes, I ment refrigerator 😁 pardon my English..

I have to try that again, maybe there was too little of water with them.. Is the temperature how precise?
 

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Quote: I have to try that again, maybe there was too little of water with them.. Is the temperature how precise?

No, temperature doesn't have to be precise. I would use a shallow dish to increase oxygen exchange.

Also, you could try feeding leftover shrimp in the hatchery dish by sprinkling a tiny amount of powdered Spirulina algae on the water surface. I grind up pellets of Spirulina Algae into a powder (mortar and pestle) and add a little of the resulting powder to my brine shrimp jars. The shrimp don't die and they grow a little for a few days. If you add light to the system to get the algae to grow it might work really well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Quote: I have to try that again, maybe there was too little of water with them.. Is the temperature how precise?

No, temperature doesn't have to be precise. I would use a shallow dish to increase oxygen exchange.

Also, you could try feeding leftover shrimp in the hatchery dish by sprinkling a tiny amount of powdered Spirulina algae on the water surface. I grind up pellets of Spirulina Algae into a powder (mortar and pestle) and add a little of the resulting powder to my brine shrimp jars. The shrimp don't die and they grow a little for a few days. If you add light to the system to get the algae to grow it might work really well.
Nice, thank you for this. I have to try it with new patch of shrimps and see how it goes. I'd like to feed BBS more often since it really seems that my fish enjoy "lively dinner" and those little creatures get the colors of the Rasbora to shine. But runnigh 24/7 shrimp factory for 8 Rasboras is a little bit of a overkill :D
 

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Quote: But running a 24/7 shrimp factory for 8 Rasboras is a little bit of a overkill :D

Makes perfect sense! We don't want to become prisoners of our fish.
 

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Nice, thank you for this. I have to try it with new patch of shrimps and see how it goes. I'd like to feed BBS more often since it really seems that my fish enjoy "lively dinner" and those little creatures get the colors of the Rasbora to shine. But runnigh 24/7 shrimp factory for 8 Rasboras is a little bit of a overkill :D
You can try to culture daphnia indoors or outdoors. It could be easy or really hard depending on your luck :)
Grindalworms are easy to culture and small for nano fishes.
 

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Luck is the name of the game. For years I tried culturing daphnia in tanks with lush green water. Total failure! In the meantime, I discovered that my outdoor tub (100 gal livestock trough with no fish) had seasonal daphnia blooms--like right now. My guppies love them!
 

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Luck is the name of the game. For years I tried culturing daphnia in tanks with lush green water. Total failure! In the meantime, I discovered that my outdoor tub (100 gal livestock trough with no fish) had seasonal daphnia blooms--like right now. My guppies love them!
Hmm, maybe the rainwater in the outdoor tub is the key for you. For me, adding crushed coral helps.
I also I have Moina, a smaller daphnia relative (bbs size) that’s much more parameter tolerant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I think I have to try also other live foods. Doing any outdoors culturing is not practical where I live since most of the year temperarures are too low and winter tends to halt all living things 😁

Any advicenon how to start with Grindalworms?
 

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Any advicenon how to start with Grindalworms?
They’re pretty easy. You can grow them in potting soil but I use coco coir to lessen pests. I use a shoe box size container with a big hole in the lid. I super glue a coffee filter over the hole to keep out pest. I feed them fish food. They should feed on the food before mold takes hold or throw away the moldy food. The soil should be moist. They do best in 65-75F temperature.

to harvest, I put the food on a plastic mesh. The worms will climb up off the dirt. Feed to your fish.

since you live in the cold, white worms is a bigger relative but prefers temperatures of 55-65f. They’re good for bigger fish like gourami, barbs, etc...
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
They’re pretty easy. You can grow them in potting soil but I use coco coir to lessen pests. I use a shoe box size container with a big hole in the lid. I super glue a coffee filter over the hole to keep out pest. I feed them fish food. They should feed on the food before mold takes hold or throw away the moldy food. The soil should be moist. They do best in 65-75F temperature.

to harvest, I put the food on a plastic mesh. The worms will climb up off the dirt. Feed to your fish.

since you live in the cold, white worms is a bigger relative but prefers temperatures of 55-65f. They’re good for bigger fish like gourami, barbs, etc...
Thank you for the information. I have to study this more :)
 
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