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Hi guys

This has also taken the last 30 minutes for me to read and is an excellent thread. I have a new setup using amazonia and powersand special. The tank is cycling and has been running for 12 days. I have a hint of greenwater along with the algea bloom due to the cycling.

I have not seen it mentioned, but as riccia is a fast grower would it make sense to try this as a method also? I have floated a small amount and it seems to be growing fairly quickly. I also have access to willow its everywhere here where i live.

Excellent thread guys

Brad
When you use ADA Amazonia soil I think you are initially supposed to change water every few days to keep ammonia from building up. After a month or so you don't need to do that. You could also use purigen or activated carbon in the filter for the first month to keep the ammonia under control. It is that ammonia that causes the green water to start up.
 

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Plants absorb nutrients as well through the leaves as through the roots. So, growing more roots isn't much of an advantage to the plants, except for anchoring them. I think willow cuttings are just good at absorbing ammonia from the water, as a nutrient. It is, in my opinion, ammonia in the water, in very small quantities that causes green water.
 

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very interesting read. I currently have a 9 watt UV sterilizer running on a 75 gallon tank that has been setup for like 4 days. and the water still isn't clear. maybe ill try this willow technique. I like the idea of adding diatom powder to a hot magnum turning it into a diatom filter. I may just do that. Vaughn, you still have that HOT magnum? hehe
Yes, I still have the HOT magnum filter. I'm thinking about changing my 10 gallon tank from a non-CO2, non-Excel tank to something with an emersed lawn of glosso. Maybe there is a trade that would work well for both of us? I barely ever use the filter, so it doesn't have much value for me anymore.
 

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The idea that light spectrum is a major contributer to algae growth is testable. To do that you would first need to set up 2 or more identical tanks, prove to yourself that you can keep them all algae free and stable. Then switch one or two tanks to the light spectrum you want to test. If you get significant algae in those tanks, but not in the "control" tank, that suggests that the spectrum is a problem. But, if you don't get significant algae in either of those tanks, it is virtually certain that the spectrum is not a problem. Of course, repeating this test a few times is best, also. But, above all else, you first have to determine that you can keep multiple identical tanks algae free.

I would be delighted if you decide to try this! We all have things to learn about algae.
 
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