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So I have been looking into a canister filter and I have noticed that everyone keeps the spray bar, on the left and side towards the top of the tank. I was wondering if there is any reason for this, like could I put the spray bar low to the ground. I have noticed that people have usually put them in around the same locations that a hang on the back filter would have done... they put the spray bar high, and the intake low.

I was thinking of having the intake low, and the spray bar almost touching the gravel. wouldn't this help to clean up the un-needed waist better?

Please let me know your thoughts...:twitch:
 

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IMHO spray bars are overrated in plant tanks. They tend to create greater agitation at the surface (especially when placed high in the tank!) which, as we all know, lets more precious CO2 out of the water column.

You might have a point about cleaning up the bottom a bit, but at that low in the tank they might also spray plants with an overly powerful jet of water or, with some types of soil, create dust in the water column.

I try to use the other outlets available. The ADA lily pipe is perfection. If that's out of range, marine land makes a good return outlet (with it you can adjust the flow of water in a couple of different ways or take off the nozzle completely for a less directed flow. And though I worship Eheim canisters (they're pretty much all I use at this point), I won't use their spray bars or their other virtually unalterable return outlet.

Just my opinion.
 

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I have a couple of Rena XP filters and place the spray bar near the top but I rotate the jets downward. This gives me a current from top back to bottom front that doesn't agitate the surface to outgas my co2. I play with the downward angle to give me the best current for the plant arrangement.
 

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Some surface agitation is advantageous. That is an easy way to get a bit more oxygen into the water, and it completely avoids surface slime. The slight additional loss of CO2 is easily compensated for by increasing the bubble rate a bit.
 

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Yes i've been testing just how much surface agitation effects the loss of co2 and it's not a huge amount. Granted if you are running DIY i wouldn't recommend this, but another bubble or two per second will easily make up for the surface agitation, even when i had the powerhead and the spraybar breaking the surface in a 26 gallon bowfront, i could keep the co2 consistant with my ph controller, and it definitely took a while for the co2 to outgas. For anybody wondering with a pressurized system if they should increase their surface agitation to increase the oxygen in the tank it's completely fine to do so, just adjust your co2 and watch your drop checker. I've read information on the The Barr Report to support this. The only downside is you will waste more co2, but i consider that a small price to pay for more oxygen in the tank for the fish, and no surface scum.

Stevie D
 

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My spraybar (Eheim 2215 in a 46g bow) is nearly vertical with its output directed to the right hand side of the tank, encouraging a clockwise rotation of tankwater on a vertical axis. This seems to create just enough surface agitation to keep any scum from forming but not so much that I can't maintain a decent CO2 level w/ my DIY setup. It also allows me to pretty well hide my spraybar behind driftwood. I have also noticed that I've got less clado in my HM in this tank than in my 5g at work w/ a horizontal circulation axis (internal whisper filter, also w/ DIY CO2).
 

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I'm with Hoppy on this one. Mine is near the top angled slightly upwards to create a gentle agitation on the surface. One thing I did was bore the holes out slightly larger on the spray bar so current flow would be a little bit less.
 

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13mm rigid tubing should work (half inch would probably also do, in a pinch), if you're handy with a drill and can come up w/ something to cap one end.

Make sure your flexible tubing is quite secure...
 

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I try to use the other outlets available. The ADA lily pipe is perfection. If that's out of range, marine land makes a good return outlet (with it you can adjust the flow of water in a couple of different ways or take off the nozzle completely for a less directed flow. And though I worship Eheim canisters (they're pretty much all I use at this point), I won't use their spray bars or their other virtually unalterable return outlet.

Just my opinion.
Do you have a link to one of those? I would love to see what they look like.
 

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Well that depends, i believe ADA charges $10 to look at one of their products.. ;-)
LOL.

Yeah, they cost a pretty penny, no doubt. And they're not for everyone. If you've got fifty two tanks in your bathroom, eighty three in your living room, and hit another four with your elbows when you sleep... it might be best to get something else.

But if you're investing in just a couple of showpiece aquariums that you plan to concentrate on, you can't beat the quality of ADA. I admit, I don't see a reason to use glassware on non-open top aquariums. Or if your outlets are hidden, don't waste the money. But if beauty and quality are a priority... they're something to consider.

Here's some links, Jimbo:

www.adgshop.com (look under the filtration system) for the lily pipes.

And below for the Marineland one. I'm not sure if this is actually the same one I've used, but if not it's similar. One thing to note: when trying to get the tubing on, it helps to dip the tip of the tubing in some hot water to loosen it up.

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?c=3578+10090+14680&pcatid=14680
 
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