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I just replied to your earlier post and see that my tardy advice is now somewhat irrelevant, but hopefully there's a message for others.
Tank looks very nice and promising.
Your floating and blossoming red plants are beautiful. What a treat to see them this morning!
 

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If they can just utterly clean out the water column of nitrogen to this extreme, no wonder my tank became deficient while I wasn't feeding it. The poor suffering stem plants, overrun by these voracious floating monsters.
Yes, this seems to be the most convincing reason that the floaters, not bacteria, are responsible for the observed ammonia reduction.
Now to figure out how I'm ever going to be able to keep these things fed. Goodie.
Most people have fish in the tank and are constantly adding fishfood. My guppies get more than they need, so they are fat and plants get plenty of nutrients. Attached is 10 gal tank with 6 male and 6 female guppies, plus shrimp and snails.
For NPK, I would add fishfood or your magic potion. For the floater, I would add chelated iron (FeEDTa) or a micro-nutrient fertilizer.
Based on your posts, I think you pretty much know what to do and what's going on and enjoy tweaking and tinkering. ;) Terrific!
 

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Oxygen in the overlying water makes iron unavailable to plants. After the iron enters the water column it is converted to iron oxides, which plants cannot use.

You write: "Water lettuce are showing chlorosis, and their roots are growing desperately out of control."

I think your water lettuce looks just fine, sort of like mine in some tanks. If those roots can reach the substrate, then you will see real growth. If your other floater continue to grow, I would just relax.

I resisted iron fertilization for decades, because I wanted to stick with a purist approach. But I've given in. Once in awhile if I see real iron deficiency and my floating plants are dying, I'll add FeEDTA.
However, since (2021) I started keeping tanks without filters or aerators. Now, I have almost no problem with iron deficiency in my floating plants. [Filter bacteria and aeration (oxygen!) will remove soluble iron from the water column.]

These filter-less tanks are great. I now have 9 guppy breeding tanks with only floating plants and potted plants--no deep substrate. I've described them in a recent article 'Potted Plants for Fish Breeding Tanks' on my book's website: Planted Aquariums
 

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My tanks all contain well-fed shrimp, snails, and fish. All moving around and excreting. Tank is filled with plant nutrients!

In nutrient-depleted habitats, water movement can be vital for bringing scarce nutrients to plants. As nutrient levels increase, one would expect that water movement becomes less important.

When I got rid of the pumps, filters, bubblers etc from my tanks last year, I wasn't sure that my new system would work for my guppy breeding and rearing tanks. But it did, even better than I predicted! No nitrate build-up and ammonia/nitrite is zero.

I think you just have to devise a system that works for your tank(s). Stirring the water when you add nutrients is a good idea.

There may be mycorrhizal fungi associated with the roots of floating plants, just as some have been found on a few substrate-rooted aquatic plants. Good point.
 

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Quote: "So until then, the tank will be left to its own devices and we'll see how it is when I get back. Probably better than trying to intervene myself. Just let nature take its course. "

Yes, let nature do the work!

The growth of algae causes a rise in pH due to CO2 uptake. Bacteria growth would lower it. Cloudiness is usually a mix of bacteria and planktonic algae.

Be careful with over-trimming. When you reduce the plant biomass too much, algae can gain an upper hand.

Those floaters with their big root systems have the "aerial advantage." They are highly effective in combatting algae and protecting your submerged plants.
 

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Yes, it does sound like fun! But definitely will need help of a biologist! What you've photographed are the big animals (protozoa and probably debris--unless it's moving).
Your tank's cloudiness could be due to bacteria and micro-algae that you will not see without 400- 1,000X magnification. For the bacteria, you will need special staining or a dedicated microscope (phase-contrast?).
The size of bacteria range from 0.2 to 20 microns. Micro-algae are somewhat larger.
 
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