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I agree with BryceM that you shouldn’t use CaCl as this adds a lot of Cl, which is not good for fish.

If you are not adding a lot of Mg you might try MgCO3 and CaSO4. Using these will keep down your TDS and increase kH; however, if you need a lot of Mg, you will have a solubility problem.

You are still going to need something else to keep your pH stable. If your tap water is adding kH and not much gH that implies that it has a lot of sodium. It is impossible to increase kH much without sodium so I would just use NaHCO3 and skip the tap water altogether.

As far as trace elements, you can add these, it will not hurt, but I doubt that fish take in trace elements like plants do. They get what they need from their food. If the food you are feeding your fish is alive (rotifers, paramecium, micro-worms) then they probably have the “right stuff” for your fish.
 

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You are asking way more questions than I can answer reasonably.

Here are some answers not necessarily in any order.

Chlorides are not the same thing as chlorine.

Here is something that you seem to be confused about. Things like Kent's liquid Calcium are designed for Marine aquaria. Salt water fish have entirely different requirements for water. In general products designed for one environment are not suitable for the other.

Calcium chloride is a salt. When you put it in water you get Ca+2 + 2 Cl-
Calcium Sulfate is a salt. When you put it in water you get Ca+2 + SO4-2
Both give you the same calcium ion but different acid ions.

All the different Calcium Sulfates become the same in water. I cannot say for sure why companies don't use Calcium Sulfate but it may be that it is not very soluble in water and they cannot sell it as a concentrated solution. It is more difficult for people to use powders accurately because they do not have scales to weigh the stuff.
Here are places to buy food grade Calcium Sulfate:
http://www.soymilkquick.com/gypsum.php
http://www.sciencelab.com/page/S/PVAR/10410/SLC5545

Things like Sodium(Na+), Potassium(K+), Chlorides(Cl-), Phosphates (PO4-3) Nitrates (NO3-) etc. are only found in very small quantities dissolved in fresh water. Some of these like Cl- are toxic to some fresh water fish. And some like NO3- are only found in polluted water.

Things like Calcium (Ca+2), Magnesium(Mg+2), Sulfate (SO4-2) and Carbonate (CO2-2) are commonly found in fresh water.

You would only like to add things from the second group to your tank but when you want to maintain special conditions, you have to compromise and add things from group one.

To come up with your own special tank requirements is not that easy to do. You have to understand a lot of chemistry. My feeling is that you should stick with a commercial program and not worry to much about the minor differences between them and what you think is the best aquarium conditions.

That being said, if you insist on making your own special water you need to get organized. Write down all the special conditions you want to maintain (make sure you include everything). For example:

kH 3 - 6
gH 4 - 7
pH 5 - 7
Ca/Mg 2 - 5
TDS 100 - 200
Etc.

Now just because you can write it doesn't mean it can be done. Most of these requirements are interdependent and changing one will change another; so, it is possible to have a tank requirement that cannot be produced.

OK you probably already know the rules:
Ca and Mg increase gH
CO3 increase kH
Reducing pH reduces kH
Everything increases TDS

Now using only things from group 2 or as little as possible from group 1, make your recipe. Believe me this is a very tough problem!
 

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OK getting back to your original question.

I looked up the data on Kent RO Right and Seachem equilibrium and agree with you. Seachem's formula has too much K and Kent's has too much Cl. I probably would not use either of these.

This is what I do. I mix my city water with RO water until I get a conductivity of about 120 microS. Then I adjust the pH to 6.5 using dilute H2SO4.

I change 20% of my tank each week using this.

When I test the water I get 5 deg gH, 1-2 deg kH, ca/mg = 1.

Since I'm also growing plants, I add KHPO4, KNO3, CO2 Flourish Excel and a bunch of trace elements. All these plus fish food tend to increase conductivity.

At 180 - 200 microS, I start changing water with pure RO.
 

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I suppose you are right! I’m assuming that mats808 needs soft acid water to breed his fish; so, adjusting pH is a requirement. I guess you might try NaHSO4 instead but that will add Na+

I’m not sure that NaHSO4 is safer than 0.05M H2SO4 but you can buy it at most pet supply locations.

The truth is that fooling around with chemistry involves the use of a lot of potent chemicals and you really need to know what you’re doing; so, you don’t get into trouble.
 
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