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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This weekend I was out visiting a lake and surrounding countryside north of New York City. The leaves are all down in the streams and the water is very cool.

I collected some aquatic moss samples from a stream and a lake. I believe they are both the same, though the plant growing in the fast moving stream was elongated as a result of growing in flowing water. The moss growing in the lake was in the littoral zone in under 40cm of water. Both plants were attached to rocks.

My initial research suggests these plants could be ascribed to Fontinalis antipyretica. But looking a little further into the classification of these plants indicates there are a number of species with some classification problems to be worked out in the future by specialists.

I managed to take a couple of photos of the plant on the lake shore (excuse the poor quality, my camera is a little Canon Powershot and while it is wonderfully portable and small, it is hard put to produce a good close up shot).

My question for the board is: has anyone used Fontinalis antipyretica in an aquarium? If so, how would you suggest getting strands to take to rock? Any experiences?

The water temperature of the lake varies between close to freezing in the winter to the mid 80s F in the summer, by the way.

My site search seems to indicate that very few people use the Fontinalis sp. mosses. I see them in ADA aquaria photos. But cannot recall seeing them in any American aquaria photos.

For those interested, the folowing link contains a list of these moss types:
http://fins.actwin.com/aquatic-plants/month.200109/msg00015.html

Here are the photos:
Lake shore:

Sample (ignore the Riccia):


Andrew Cribb
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, RedBaron.

The books all seem to say this is a low temperature plant. There must be a number of varieties, though. Here in NY we get pretty cold winters and very hot summers, so the local variety must be pretty hardy. If it can't survive my aquarium, then it doesn't say anything good about my aquatic gardening skills, does it? :)

I am going to give it a shot and see what happens.

Andrew Cribb
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Urkevitz,

Good to know you. Thanks for the response. Isn't it odd that we see many Amano aquariums with well-developed stands of Fontinalis antipyretica and yet I rarely if ever see it for sale (not at Tropica, for instance) and never see it discussed. It's a mystery compared to Vesicularia dubyana, 'Taiwan', and 'Erect' mosses.

I've got the two types intermingled and growing in a small 5g aquarium with some circulation. I hope it takes.

The moss I collected was full of life including some caterpillar-like aquatic larvae?

Andrew Cribb
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If that's the case, I answered my own question by accident. I will go back to the photos and if there is one which seems to prove otherwise, I will scan it and show the image here. Thanks for the input.

Considering how profusely Fontinalis sp. grows in some areas, it would be surprising to find it cannot be propogated in an aquarium.

Andrew Cribb
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Now that is interesting. I suspected that might be the case because the moss I saw in the lake was certainly subject to very high light. Perhaps the moss in the stream might be under overhanging trees (Autumn here and the leaves are all dropped).

Andrew Cribb
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks, Ghazanfar. I'm curious to hear an update when the plant has grown. As cS said, some of the Amano book photos mislabel Vesicularia dubyana as being FA. But some of the moss is not Vesicularia dubyana. It's an interesting mystery.

So, although your aquaria were depleted by plant enthusiasts during the AGA event, you did manage to pick up something from Amano and friends? :) Glad to see you were rewarded for your work.

Andrew Cribb
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Karen,

Great information. Thank you. Yes, Fontinalis does look and feel rougher. It must be a fairly hardy plant to surivive typical New England summer/winter conditions, yet alone those pertaining to an aquarium.

I assume it took to rocks fairly well.

Andrew Cribb
 
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