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I was just thinking about this and doesnt peat make water more acidic? If thats the case then how would you go about checking on your CO2 levels? If you have peat in your lower substrate levels that can still alter pH right?
 

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It should have sufficient gravel on top to avoid it from effecting your water. It should only bring the PH down in the substrate. Plus we're only talking about small amounts, I used about 5 handfulls for the 90 gallon mixed with a bag of flourite.

Giancarlo Podio
 

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whoa i didnt know that you only had to use a little. hmm how much peat and fertiplant plus would you use to furnish a lower substrate for a 40 gallon(36"x15")? im planning on topping the lower substrate off with about 60 pounds of eco complete and about 30 pounds of tahitian moon sand.
 

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You don't need to add any more organic matter to Ferti-plant. It already contains a very concentrated source of humics, so peat would be very redundant. You should use enough ferti-plant to make a 1/2" layer on the base. That stuff is too expensive due to import costs and hobbyist gouging. I learned how to make it myself for pennies on the dollar...
 

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Based on some emails that I've swapped with folks in Singapore, it seems Amano powersand and Aquasoils have enough peat to substancially effect pH. This of corse ruins the pH-KH-CO2 charts and requires you to adjust CO2 levels based on pearling.... definately not the place to start but you can work around these issues... the ability of peat to alter pH fades after a few months and the system stabilizies.

If you want to use a little more peat than a handful or two you could presoak it for a few months, changing this water a few times a week.

Jeff
 

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You can get a rough estimate of the CO2 content by adding a small amount of the peat/gravel etc to a glass of water and also to another glass of water w/o. Measure the difference in pH.

The CO2 content of these two glasses will be exactly the same.

CO2 of glass with peat= 4ppm, pH 6.8
CO2 of plain water= 4ppm, pH 7.4

7.4-6.8= - 0.6pH unit adjustment

This assume a linear relationship but nonetheless, seems to work well within the ranges we tend to use.


Regards,
Tom Barr
 
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