Aquatic Plant Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,580 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well, I'm going to rescape my 50g(36*18*18 )..but I need your suggestions for the planting. Here's what I'm thinking of-
Background(left>right):
Cyperus helferi
L. spec. "Plantanal"
L. spec. "Cuba"
H. guianensis or E.stellata? Need a better suggestion
Rotala spec. 'Green'
Myriophyllum mattogrossense v 'green'
Midground(left>right):
Rotala sp. 'pussila'
H. micranthemoides
Hydrothrix gardneri
H. zosterifolia 'narrow leaf'
---Slender piece of driftwood covered with Monosolenium tenerum
Rotala macaranda 'narrow leaf'
Tonina fluviatilis
Foreground(left>right):
Glossostigma elatinoides
Lobelia cardinalis "dwarf"
Blyxa japonica "dwarf"
Suggestions? :?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
Just let me know if your able to get all those plants!!!! Sounds like it is going to be beautiful!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,715 Posts
Are you trying to follow a more Dutch style, Raul? Sounds like it the way you are listing all these species in fore-mid-background.

Carlos
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,580 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, it's going be semi-Dutch...not following all the rules strictly, just the basis. But I'm thinking of putting the Pantanal where the narrow-leaf is and replacing it will Rotala macrandra, maybe Robert's 'Red Cherry', or maybe even L.aquatica? Tell me what you think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,715 Posts
If you want a more impressive display of bold plant groupings, though, I would cut back down on the number of species to about 9-11, especially since you already have several large, showy stem plants in the list such as Ludwigia sp Pantanal, Ludwigia sp Cuba, Eusteralis stellata, etc. That way, you will have larger, more impressive groupings instead of 3-4 stems per species. You also don't have to go in there pruning every day just to keep one plant from smothering its neighbor (like Tonina getting smothered by Myriophyllum mattogrossense 'green', etc) Aquascaping with a lot of species brings a whole host of extra problems beyond just not having enough space. It will also be much easier to maintain and more visually rewarding (i.e., lacking the tossed salad look). Believe me, I know.

Could you draw us a little diagram? That will give us a clearer picture of what you are trying to achieve.

If your goal is to have a collector's "aquascape," then you are on the right track.

Carlos
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,580 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Here's the basic layout-
1. Cyperus helferi
2. Rotala sp. 'Green'
3. Ludwigia spec. "Cuba"
4. M. mattogrossense v 'green'
5. H. micranthemoides
6. Hydrothrix gardneri
7. H. zosterifolia ‘narrow leaf’
8. Ludwigia spec. “Pantanal”
9. Tonina fluviatilis
Others:
On Driftwood- Monosolenium tenerum
Lining Driftwood, Corners- either Lobelia or Blyxa? Which will look better?
Foreground: Glossostigma elatinoides
More suggestions? :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,715 Posts
Right now, I think your layout is too symmetrical. The Ludwigia sp Cuba, the most eye catching plant in your tank, is in the dead center with green Rotalas flanking it on both sides. The driftwood is also square in the middle. Also, if you want to create a succesfful "wall to wall" stem plant arrangement, you cannot have them so neatly organized in squares. You need to have diagonal rows that stretch from front to back to help create depth and visual interest. You'll have to use plants that contrast in both leaf shape and color. You'll also have to keep in mind their growth habits.

The division between foreground, midground, and background should never be so absolute. I continue to think that having plants divided that way in the album is a disservice/misinformation for beginning aquascapers.

I would take out the green Rotala and place the Ludwigia sp Cuba right there, creating a swath of the plant from behind the driftwood. The swath can then give way to the redder Ludwigia sp Pantanal in the midgroud, for example. The Rotala sp Green, Hemianthus micranthemoides, and Heteranthera zosterifolia are also excellent candidates for creating diagonal plantings that stretch from the back toward right into the foreground. Tonina and Cyperus, IMO, would make excellent accent plants to draw the eye because of their unique foliage and upright structure.

For inspiration on wall to wall planting, NBAT's Dutch tanks:

http://www.nbat.nl/aquarium4/keuringgezel/keuringgezel03.html
http://www.nbat.nl/aquarium3/keuringgezel/keuringgezel02.html

Carlos
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,580 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Carlos! Firstly, I'm trying to follow Dutch aquascaping rules, sorry for giving you that impression. What I meant by following the basis, was that the driftwood is to be totally covered, contrast will be of major importance, and having vertical lines. I don't really care for the diagonal lines, but maybe I'll try that. My layout doesn't depict exactly how it's going to be. You told me to give you an image, and I just gave you the basic idea. The driftwood is going to be more to right, leaving more room for the left side(Where the H. zosterifolia, etc. is) Should I group the Rotala 'Green' to effectively lower diagonally(from where it is in the image) to the H.micranthemoides? I believe it will work since they have quite similar leaf shapes? And will grouping all the Rotala 'Green' near the Cyperus, instead of on the sides of Ludwigia be better? But would having the Ludwigia "Cuba" near the Myrio look nice? Maybe by creating a diagonal contrast with the Tonina(light green>dark) to make it level up to the background? It's going to have 196w, so lighting won't be an issue for the Tonina? Sorry for the long post...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,715 Posts
To me, this is a painting by color aquascape. The effective contrasts between plants will be something you will have to try yourself and see what you like. If you feel that moving a plant elsewhere in the tank (or taking it out) would be better, you can easily do it since you are using mostly stem plants.

Don't worry about getting it right the first time and play around with the different leaf patterns and textures to find the arrangement you like the most. Have patience. And most of all have fun with it.

Very few aquascapers ever have all their plant choices and plant positioning set right from the start. :) There is always some tweaking involved in some form or another.

Carlos
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top