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Asking for algae advice always brings out a number of responses. Unfortunately you're usually left to sort through multiple pieces of conflicting advice. Be wary of anyone who offers their ideas as the ideal solution for each and every situation.

As a general rule, I stick with one or two ideas. When all else fails, focus on taking care of the plants. 2.6 wpg over a 10g tank isn't the same as 2.6wpg of light over a 75g tank. In general, it takes a bit more wattage to achieve the same intensity with small tanks. It's also useless to compare 2.6 wpg of fluorescent to anything illuminated by LED's.

Is 2.6 wpg enough? That depends on what you're trying to grow. For crypts, ferns, and easier stem plants, that should be more than plenty. DIY CO2 should also be just fine for a 10g tank assuming it's reasonably consistent. If you're trying to grow more demanding species, it might be on the low side. Most likely, light intensity isn't your problem. Leaving an insufficient quantity of light on for more hours per day won't help anything but the algae.

Excel is a reasonable supplement to what might be insufficient CO2, but it won't have much direct effect on thread algae - almost zero in my experience.

In my own tanks, I have the biggest issues with hair or thread algae when phosphate levels are relatively high and nitrate levels are relatively low. There is more than one type of thread algae though.

It would help if you provide some additional information on what plants you keep, what fertilizers you use, and what equipment you're using.
 

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Here's an intersting article about usual the lighting intensity that Amano uses. It certainly isn't the final word on light intensity, but it does provide some interesting food for thought. Using Amano's setups as a baseline, the author came up with a formula which fits the data fairly well. This does not take into account the type of setup he was trying to create. Java fern and anubias tanks will be set up differently than demanding stem plants.

Using the formula you'd need:

65 watts for a 10g aquarium (6.5 wpg)
137 watts for a 50g aquairum (2.7 wpg)
247 watts for a 180g aquairum (1.4 wpg)

Now, this isn't written in stone, but it should give you some idea that the watts/gallon "rule" doesn't apply that well to big (>75g) or small (<20g) tanks.

It's also important to note that 26W of T-8 lighting with no reflectors and old bulbs is not the same thing as 26W of T5 lighting with quality reflectors. The difference in usable light can be enormous.
 

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Super,

I find the tone of your relply to be a bit brash and unfriendly. If your intent here is to simply be insulting, please send me an insulting PM. At least that way others won't need to view it.

What I find to be interesting about this particular article isn't so much the suggested mangitude of the light, but the differences in the needs of small and large tanks. Of course the quality of the lights makes a difference. The watt/aquarium size relationship will hold true no matter what type of light source you're using. The issue is fairly complex. Refraction, dispersion, reflection, wavelength, reflectors, bulb geometry........ it all comes into play. Tank size is simply one variable - and one that doesn't fit the wpg "rule" very well.

BTW, I've looked through your journal and your tank certainly is nice. It's populated almost exclusively with low-light, undemanding species. I would expect it to do marvelously well with the light you describe. You describe it yourself as a low-light, low-maintenence tank.

I'm simply trying to make the point that one person's demands are not the same as anothers. Comments like

Your problem is quite obviously 2.6WPG with unstable CO2 and/or poor circulation.
are narrow-minded. The OP's problem certainly isn't obvious to those who have experience with a wide variety of setups.
 

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No problem.

To get back to the OP's question, I think that Excel isn't likely to be the only answer to the problem. Hair/thread algae formation is influenced by nutrients and light levels. Excel is OK, and if you want to use it with shrimp, I'd stick to the dosage on the bottle or maybe just a tad more. The solution to your algae issues will probably require a change to your regular routine, depending on the specifics of your setup.
 
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