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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. I just finnished my first crypt for crypts ( :lol: )
I wish to try nd flower crypts, but am very much in the beginning of understanding this extraordinary genus.
What I've done so far was grab the bottom of a soda bottle, fill it with a minimal layer (1/8") of clay enriched gravel, covered with 2/3" of mossed soil, and topped with 1/2" of plain gravel.
Put this inside a 1/2 gal globe and filled with water a couple of inches above the substrate level.
Here's a photo to help understand the setup;


It's a C. ciliata that receives low indirect sunlight, and has no heating device (water may be around 15ºC). I'd like to be hardly criticised on anyways to improve this setup...

Cheers,
Pedro
 

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Pedro,

Welcome to APC. You've come to the right place if you're into discussing crypts.

Regarding your setup there. That's a great idea and might be a good home for a Betta in the future. Right now though, I would drain the water to the top of the soda bottle "pot" and would mist regularly. This will give your plant access to atmospheric CO2 and will help it adapt quite a bit. Right now your plant is pretty weak from shipping and transplanting and sitting in a bowl of still water like it is will likely kill it.

It wouldn't hurt to also put a piece of plastic wrap over the top of the bowl and poke some holes in it. This will help keep the air humid and allow for gas exchange. After the plant has put off a couple leaves you could start opening up more and more of the top until it's gradually completely open over the period of a few weeks. This will help your plant acclimate to the ambient humidity where daily misting will be sufficient.

You've got the hardware and concept right on now you just need to look after your plant and you'll be very successful. C. ciliata is a great plant and should do very well for you.

Best,
Phil
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Phil, thanks a lot for your tips. I've lowered the waterlevel to the point where leafs are airborne to improve CO2 as you said. I've covered the top with celofane plastic and punctured 4 small holes in it. Will keep an eye on the plant to check for it's evolution.
Do you have any suggestions as to temperature? I'm thinking of dipping the bowl on a warm water container (25º) that'd be nice for the plant wouldn't it?

Cheers,
Pedro
 

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Pedro,

Yes, you plant will appreciate having warm feet. The warm water bath sounds like a good idea. Also, you might want to poke a few more holes in the celophane if you can do it without wrecking it. A little extra gas exchange wouldn't hurt.

Best,
Phil
 

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I am thinking that, once your C. ciliata gets going, it is going to be one to two feet tall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ops, then I'll have to migrate it to one of my 2 liter pepsi-domes :p

Thanks for the info,
Pedro
 

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Bon dia!

C. ciliata will grow too big for your container as Paul said. I would use C. wendtii instead.

No matter what species you use, you need to encourage the plant to transfer its leaves from submersed to emersed. The easiest way to do this IME is lowering the water level to the leaf level and letting it evaporate slowly. You will see the plant put out aerial leaves soon.

Maintain a fair amount of humidity. Certainly this can be accomplished via celophane paper or the like. Once the aerial leaves appear, slowly start adding holes to the paper. Your plant will adapt to your home's humidity level if it is not too low.

As Paul recommends, adding a few flakes of oatmeal will provide some CO2 for the plant that will be welcomes.
 
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