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You will have a high light tank with either of the lighting options you mention, either the 3+ or the 2.5 watts per gallon. I'm assuming those lights will have good reflectors in them. If not, you won't have high light.

So, with the high light you need to be using CO2 from the day you first plant it, you will need a fertilizing routine set up to dose NPK and trace elements - see the fertilizing forum stickies for a couple of routines that work well. And, you will need to heavily plant the tank from the beginning with fast growing stem plants, not the plants you listed. (Heavily planted, means cover almost all of the substrate with single stems planted about an inch or less apart.)

You listed Amazon swords - big mistake. That plant very quickly gets far too big for any aquarium with high light. The Ozelot sword is only a little better.

Of the others you listed, only the Hygrophila is a fast growing stem plant. You could add Hygro difformis, ludwigia repens, stargrass, Rotala rotundifolia, willow leaf Hygrophila, Limnophila aromatica, and any number of other easy to grow stem plants. These will grow rapidly and absorb the small ammonia secretions from the fish and plant decay before any algae spores see the ammonia and start growing.

Once the tank is settled down, and you have learned how to fertilize and keep the CO2 concentration where it belongs, you can start replacing those fast growing stem plants, a few at a time, with plants you like better.

The XP3, in my opinion, will not be big enough for that size tank. You need lots of flow in the water in the tank to keep all of the water freely circulating. That means a big filter and/or a powerhead or two in the tank.
 

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I suggest avoiding Alternanthera reineckii. My experience with that has been disappointing for several reasons. Primarily it seems to be an algae magnet, which I think results from its very dense growth which doesn't allow water to circulate in it. There are other red plants that are much easier to keep free of algae - Polygonum kawagoneum, for example.

If you plant one stem per square inch of substrate that should be enough, so calculate the area of the substrate in square inches and that would be about how many individual stems you need.

The problem with planting both the plants you want and the fast growing stem plants at the same time is that the stem plants soon shade all of the slower growers, making life difficult for them. But, it shouldn't hurt to try it.
 

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There are several good layouts you can try, not just the high plants in back, medium in the middle, low in front layout. Right now I have a driftwood arrangement in the center of my tank, surrounded by Hygrophila "porto velho" and lobelia cardinalis, small form, with a few Limnophila aromatica directly behind the wood. That leaves lots of room for fish to swim and, best of all, for water to freely circulate. But, that's just one of many "aquascapes" that are possible.
 

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I think 2.2 watts per gallon, with half of it coming from T5 fixtures, would be enough light to grow almost any plant, with the possible exception of carpet plants. For the plants you want, if you stick to Marsilea minuta for the carpet plant, you should do fine, or even have a bit too much light. It would be a good light set up in my opinion.
 
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