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C. affinis, C. aponogetifolia, C. crispatula balansae, C. usteriana are all said to do well in hard water. I don't think that hard water bothers many of the Sri Lankan crypts, such as C. wendtii, C. beckettii, C. walkeri and C. undulata. There are some C. cordata varieties (those with the most polyploidy) that do all right in hard water, and others that don't. That's all I can think of now. There may be some I have missed.
 

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"Cave" crypts

Not the full list, just some remarks and observations. Collecting and/or observing crypts in their natural karstic (hard water) environement is a great way to make travelling in South East Asia more amusing:
Cryptocorynes cilliata grows submerged in dense patches in Khlong Song Nam in Thailand, Krabi province. Locality first described by Jacobsen in place in AQUA PLANTA 2 / 2005. Here, a karst spring at the feet of the cone karst mountains gives rise to a stream with strong current of clean bluish water. Soon it gets into a transition mangrove zone with marshy tidal pools. Crypts grow richly both submerged in the current and also emerged around it. Charming, unusal sight. In the same province, a deep karst plunge has its floor „carpeted" with C. cordata (water analysis from 1997 and 2005 available). Very clean water with very high Ca content. Various crypts of the Crispatula group ( would not dare to ID the exact subspecie) are rather frequent sight in nearly all clean karstic springs, or clean karstic rivers in Indochina, for instance in Vang Vieng (N. Laos) in Nam Hin Boun /Central Laos) amd elsewhere in Thailand. In Phillipines I collected C. aponogetifolia in a streeam close to Calabidongan limestone cave, Albay province, Luzon. Hard water environement seems much more frequent in tropical Asia than people admitt ..
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Okay. So far we have:

C. affinis
C. beckettii
C. wendtii
C. aponogetifolia
C. usteriana
C. undulata
C. walkerii
C. cordata (unsure if the different varieties will)
C. crispatula (unsure on varieties)
C. ciliata

Keep em coming.
 

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PaiNai's post about all the hard water springs in S.E. Asia reminds me that the two well known places in the United States where escaped Crypts flourish---Rainbow River, Florida, and the San Marcos River, Texas both arise as limestone springs.

C. beckettii in the San Marcos river
 

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Wow I've got to go snorkeling in the San Marcos next time I'm down to San Antonio. I think the Rainbow is a must stop for the GWAPA Florida excursion too, eh Sean?

Cheers.
Jim
 

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They are very protective of a rare variety of wild rice that grows in the upper regions of the San Marcos river. You must be careful not to uproot or damage any of that. The C. beckettii is a mile or two further down the river, and when I was there in 2004, there was a project going to remove the crypts because they thought the crypts were a threat to the wild rice. As far as I could tell, all the wild rice was growing quite a ways upstream of where the crypts began to show up. .
 

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You can add bullosa and keei to the list too.

I've found that the hard water Crypts really benefit from fast flowing water too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Bullosa and keei? Surely you jest!

In all seriousness, I'm rather surprised. I was under the impression they were the "peat bog" sort of crypt.

Updated (and alphabetized!!)

C. affinis
C. aponogetifolia
C. beckettii
C. bullosa
C. ciliata
C. cordata (unsure if the different varieties will)
C. crispatula (unsure on varieties)
C. keei
C. undulata
C. usteriana
C. walkerii
C. wendtii (all varieties to my limited knowledge)
 

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Yes, definitely bullosa and keei. I tried keei in my peat setup and it promptly melted away on me.
 

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You can add bullosa and keei to the list too.
This includes striolata and, by affiliation, auriculata. However, these crypts (or, at least, many strains) are very different from the usual limestone/karst crypts and *much* more difficult to grow/propagate than the other listed crypts. I'd strongly recommend to keep them in a separate category to avoid them being killed by enthusiastic buyers. There's a lot of habitat information and pics of collecting localities published or even available on the net and I'd hope that folks tap that these sources before resorting to trial and error testing with crypts collected from nature...

I've found that the hard water Crypts really benefit from fast flowing water too.
Yes, if any submersed crypt doesn't grow as nicely as expected, increasing the current can help to overcome some problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Kai, when you say they are different, how so?

Further updated:

C. affinis
C. aponogetifolia
C. auriculata
C. beckettii
C. bullosa
C. ciliata
C. cordata (unsure if the different varieties will)
C. crispatula (unsure on varieties)
C. keei
C. spiralis
C. striolata
C. undulata
C. usteriana
C. walkerii
C. wendtii (all varieties to my limited knowledge)
C. willisi x "lucens"
 

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Hello Xema,

Well, you have to consider the context when evaluating measurements: There is so much rainfall in Sarawak (almost every day), that the water at the keei type locality is actually "ultra-hard" - i.e. about as hard as water gets in Sarawak! The stream is inhabited by organisms which are rather indifferent to a wide range of water parameters (for example occuring in pure rainwater as well as in calcareous water) and specialized organisms which are only occuring in water with notable amounts of dissolved calciumcarbonates. Needless to say that the Bau area is famous for its limestone outcrops which harbor a lot of endemic plants (of which keei is one) and animals. Such limestone habitats are not exceedingly rare in Southeast Asia but their geology usually makes them natural islands in vast ecosystems with very low calcium availability.

Apparently, keei is also one of these limestone plants and most likely dependant on reasonable calcium availability. OTOH, it may not fare well in extremely hard water as not rarely found in our temperate countries. My keei are growing reasonably well but I still need to experiment to provide optimum growing conditions.

The case for striolata and bullosa is a bit more difficult and I'll comment on them later...
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Further updated:

C. affinis
C. aponogetifolia
C. auriculata
C. beckettii
C. bullosa (special case, more information needed)
C. ciliata
C. cordata (unsure if the different varieties will)
C. crispatula (unsure on varieties, balansae does)
C. keei (special case, more information needed)
C. parva
C. spiralis
C. striolata
C. undulata
C. usteriana
C. walkerii
C. wendtii (all varieties to my limited knowledge)
C. willisi x "lucens"
C. willisi


Can we add C. huduroi to the list?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Please add pontiderifolia. It grows on limestone and does spectacularly well in the liquid rock here that passes for tapwater.
Can do.

C. affinis
C. aponogetifolia
C. auriculata
C. beckettii
C. bullosa (special case, more information needed)
C. ciliata
C. cordata (unsure if the different varieties will)
C. crispatula (unsure on varieties, balansae does)
C. keei (special case, more information needed)
C. parva
C. pontederiifolia
C. spiralis
C. striolata
C. undulata
C. usteriana
C. walkerii
C. wendtii (all varieties to my limited knowledge)
C. willisi x "lucens"
C. willisi
 
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