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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Anubias has been turning slowly for awhile now and I'm not sure what the problem is. I dose my tank daily with a comprehensive mix of nutrients, but it's not stopping the Anubias from dying off still.

Can anyone identify the deficiency present here so that I can begin to fix the problem?
Flower Plant Leaf Terrestrial plant Organism
 

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Damaged leaves aren't going to 'heal'. It's best to prune off the damaged leaves so the plant can grow new ones.

Looks like deficiencies with Nitrogen, phosphate, magnesium & calcium, and potassium.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Damaged leaves aren't going to 'heal'. It's best to prune off the damaged leaves so the plant can grow new ones.

Looks like deficiencies with Nitrogen, phosphate, magnesium & calcium, and potassium.
Omg I thought it was just one thing. I figured dosing a comprehensive mix would prevent that 😩 Do I need to cut the whole leaf off or just the damaged part?
 

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Hi @TPG7541

What you see there with the darker leaf veins and lighter green to yellow areas between the leaf veins is called interveinal chlorosis. I cannot tell from the picture however if the new leaves emerge looking 'normal' and the interveinal chlorosis starts to appear as the leaf matures the likely cause is one of the mobile nutrients.....specifically magnesium. However, if the interveinal chlorosis occurs one the new leaves it likely one of the immobile nutrients....specifically iron. If you are dosing iron but the condition still occurs either insufficient iron is being dosed or the iron is not the the correct "type" for the pH of the water in your tank. Almost all of the various iron types EDTA, DTPA, EDDHA, HEDTA, and ferrous gluconate work fine in acidic water with a pH less than 7.0.On the other hand, if the water is alkaline with a pH greater than 7.0 most of the more common (and less expensive) types of iron like EDTA drop significantly in effectiveness. Is it the newer or older leaves that are showing the interveinal chlorosis? -Roy
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi @TPG7541

What you see there with the darker leaf veins and lighter green to yellow areas between the leaf veins is called interveinal chlorosis. I cannot tell from the picture however if the new leaves emerge looking 'normal' and the interveinal chlorosis starts to appear as the leaf matures the likely cause is one of the mobile nutrients.....specifically magnesium. However, if the interveinal chlorosis occurs one the new leaves it likely one of the immobile nutrients....specifically iron. If you are dosing iron but the condition still occurs either insufficient iron is being dosed or the iron is not the the correct "type" for the pH of the water in your tank. Almost all of the various iron types EDTA, DTPA, EDDHA, HEDTA, and ferrous gluconate work fine in acidic water with a pH less than 7.0.On the other hand, if the water is alkaline with a pH greater than 7.0 most of the more common (and less expensive) types of iron like EDTA drop significantly in effectiveness. Is it the newer or older leaves that are showing the interveinal chlorosis? -Roy
The big light-green leaf (main leaf) is an old leaf. The Iron that I dose is Seachem Iron which I believe is ferrous and my pH is typically between 8 and 8.2. I used to dose pH Down to bring it to around 7, but it would just go back to 8 by the next day so I just stopped.
 

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I had a feeling you were. Use regular tap water. Softened water strip out calcium & magnesium and replace them with sodium Which is bad. Plants need Ca& Mg and large amounts of Na blocks plants from up taking nutrients.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I had a feeling you were. Use regular tap water. Softened water strip out calcium & magnesium and replace them with sodium Which is bad. Plants need Ca& Mg and large amounts of Na blocks plants from up taking nutrients.
I just fill up a 3-gallon bucket in my bathtub and treat it with Seachem Prime before I add it to the tank. There's no alternate source I can get it from since the water softener system treats all the water in the house. So I guess I just need to dose Calcium and Magnesium and see if it makes a difference?
 

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Check to see if water line outside the house like to the garden is connected to the softener.
Yeah, you can add Ca & Mg. The Na could cause issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Check to see if water line outside the house like to the garden is connected to the softener.
Yeah, you can add Ca & Mg. The Na could cause issues.
Didn't think about that one. Yeah I might just have to get my water from the backyard hose. I'll look into it. Thanks mistergreen!
 

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The big light-green leaf (main leaf) is an old leaf. The Iron that I dose is Seachem Iron which I believe is ferrous and my pH is typically between 8 and 8.2.
Seachem iron is iron gluconate. Iron gluconate is not PH sensitive like the other ingredients. It will work at any PH. But it doesn't last long. Gluconate is a type of acidic sugar. So bacteria will consume the gluconate and then the iron turns into iron oxide which is not soluble in water and therefore unusable by plants. How long iron gluconate lasts in a aquarium is impossible to predict. The general recomendation for iron gluconate is to monitor your iron levels and add iron as necessary. your yellow leaf with green veins is common for iron deficiency.

The other iron fertilizers used are PH sensitive:
Iron EDTA is stable at a ph of 6.5 or less. Above 6.5 is converts to iron oxide.
Iron DTPA is stable up to a PH of 7.5 but some is still available up to a PH of about 8. Again once the PH gets too high the iron converts to iron oxide.
Iron EDDHA is stable up to a ph of 10 or 11 which would seam to make it the ideal iron fertilizer. However it is the most expensive and it imparts a red color to the water. Due to the water color issue it is seldom used in aquariums.

For most aquariums a dose of 0.1ppm if iron is sufficient for a week. My PH is about 7 so I use DTPA. Iron is never a problem.

I had a feeling you were. Use regular tap water. Softened water strip out calcium & magnesium and replace them with sodium Which is bad. Plants need Ca& Mg and large amounts of Na blocks plants from up taking nutrients.
Sodium in an aquarium isn't actually bad for for plants. However in a farm field Sodium chloride will prevent plants for absorbing water. But in softened water the sodium is in the form of sodium bicarbonate not sodium chloride. Sodium bicarbonate will push the PH and KH up and it will react with any fertilizer in the water. Many fertilizers have manganese, zinc, and copper sulfate. Mix this with sodium bicarbonate and you get sodium sulfate and insolble manganese, zinc and copper carbonate which plants cannot use. it might also react with iron gluconate.

If you are using fertilizers you want to keep your KH as low as possible.. And the easiest way you have to do that is to stopping softened water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Seachem iron is iron gluconate. Iron gluconate is not PH sensitive like the other ingredients. It will work at any PH. But it doesn't last long. Gluconate is a type of acidic sugar. So bacteria will consume the gluconate and then the iron turns into iron oxide which is not soluble in water and therefore unusable by plants. How long iron gluconate lasts in a aquarium is impossible to predict. The general recomendation for iron gluconate is to monitor your iron levels and add iron as necessary. your yellow leaf with green veins is common for iron deficiency.

The other iron fertilizers used are PH sensitive:
Iron EDTA is stable at a ph of 6.5 or less. Above 6.5 is converts to iron oxide.
Iron DTPA is stable up to a PH of 7.5 but some is still available up to a PH of about 8. Again once the PH gets too high the iron converts to iron oxide.
Iron EDDHA is stable up to a ph of 10 or 11 which would seam to make it the ideal iron fertilizer. However it is the most expensive and it imparts a red color to the water. Due to the water color issue it is seldom used in aquariums.

For most aquariums a dose of 0.1ppm if iron is sufficient for a week. My PH is about 7 so I use DTPA. Iron is never a problem.



Sodium in an aquarium isn't actually bad for for plants. However in a farm field Sodium chloride will prevent plants for absorbing water. But in softened water the sodium is in the form of sodium bicarbonate not sodium chloride. Sodium bicarbonate will push the PH and KH up and it will react with any fertilizer in the water. Many fertilizers have manganese, zinc, and copper sulfate. Mix this with sodium bicarbonate and you get sodium sulfate and insolble manganese, zinc and copper carbonate which plants cannot use. it might also react with iron gluconate.

If you are using fertilizers you want to keep your KH as low as possible.. And the easiest way you have to do that is to stopping softened water.
So my tank will never quite be healthy as long as I'm using water softener? The bad part is I don't have much of an option. They have a softener machine where I live and it's always running.
 

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You can add distilled water to cut the sodium bicarbonate down. You still need to add Ca & Mg.
you can add small amount muriatic/hydrochloric acid to the soften water to break up the bicarbonate. Do this in a separate container and let sit for a few days. Don’t add the acid directly into the aquarium. You need to experiment with the amount of acid. The pH of the water should read 6.5-7.
 

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So my tank will never quite be healthy as long as I'm using water softener? The bad part is I don't have much of an option. They have a softener machine where I live and it's always running.

It is highly unlikely that your water softener is connected to all water taps in your home. typically only the kitchen and bathroom sinks are connected In order to keep the operating cost and size of the water softener manageable. Showers toilets and outside water taps are typically not using softened water.

Get a KH (carbonate) and GH (General hardness) test kits. The KH test kit will only detect carbonate ions in the water. The GH test kit detects only calcium and magnesium. The softened water will have a very low or zero GH and a high carbonate level. Ordinary tap was has some GH and some KH. Test strips are fast )about a minute) although not as accurate while liquid GH and KH test kits are better but can take about 5 to10 minutes to preform one test Most aquarium stores will have test strips but some don't have GH and KH liquid test kits.

Test all of these levels from each water tap you can find. the back yard and shower and toilet water is likely not softened. Also there is likely a water tap next to the softener.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
So my tank will never quite be healthy as long as I'm using water softener? The bad part is I don't have much of an option. They have a softener machine where I live and it's always running.

It is highly unlikely that your water softener is connected to all water taps in your home. typically only the kitchen and bathroom sinks are connected In order to keep the operating cost and size of the water softener manageable. Showers toilets and outside water taps are typically not using softened water.

Get a KH (carbonate) and GH (General hardness) test kits. The KH test kit will only detect carbonate ions in the water. The GH test kit detects only calcium and magnesium. The softened water will have a very low or zero GH and a high carbonate level. Ordinary tap was has some GH and some KH. Test strips are fast )about a minute) although not as accurate while liquid GH and KH test kits are better but can take about 5 to10 minutes to preform one test Most aquarium stores will have test strips but some don't have GH and KH liquid test kits.

Test all of these levels from each water tap you can find. the back yard and shower and toilet water is likely not softened. Also there is likely a water tap next to the softener.
Ok perfect I'll get the test strips and make the changes accordingly. Thanks so much!
 
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