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I think your best bet would be to remove them and treat in a bare (or nearly bare) hospital tank with a sponge filter. It doesn't have to be big - 5 gallons or so.

That way you'd use less medicaton, you wouldn't have to worry about the other tank inhabitants, and they'd get into some fresh clean water, which is always a great help when fish are ailing.
 

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Just an addition:
If you're not sure of the problem, it's best not to medicate with unnecessary things and stress them out more; or build up an immunity for the med if they really need it in the future.
I'm just adding that because I see a lot of over-medicating out there and it's not good for the fish in the long run. In many of those cases, an increase in water changes works wonders. :)

As mentioned before, try to get those nitrates down to see if that helps, then proceed from there.

Keep us posted.
 

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Ack, that must be a bummer to have nitrates like that out of your tap. I missed that before.
Actually the 8.1 pH isn't that high. Mine comes out of the tap at 8.2 or so and that's were it stays in the non-C02 tanks with no problems for the fish. Of course I don't have ammonia as a concern, but your tanks sounds like it's cycled enough that it shouldn't be a worry to you either.

I would say when you switch over to the filtered water, you could safely start with 30% or maybe more (of the amount you change) being the filtered water. I think the drop in nitrates is going to be better for your fish than worrying about the other parameters too much. It probably isn't going to be enough of a change in the other things to have an impact on them anyway.

And yes, it should be fine to use the filtered water for top offs.

Good luck.
 
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