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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone! A new post on this rarely-seen stem plant Hippuris vulgaris, is up on my blog AquaBiota! Here is an excerpt of what you'll find there, for the rest click on the link below! Thank you for taking the time to check out this post ☺ Enjoy!
Inspire91

The surrounding area was quite chilly, and the stream water even more so cold, but this is exactly where we would find this plant in abundance, both immersed as well as emersed specimens. The best explanation that I can give for the look of this plant is that it has the structure of a very leafy Eustralis/Ammania, but with translucent green (like Bolbitis) leaves.


 

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Nice! Interesting to see Japanese biotopes.
I've read Your aquabiota blog post about the Hippuris vulgaris. This species is also widespread in Europe incl. almost all parts of Germany, also in the south - Spain, Italy, Greece. http://ww2.bgbm.org/EuroPlusMed/PTaxonDetailOccurrence.asp?NameId=24425&PTRefFk=7300000 Also regularly sold as pond plant. Submersed shoots are here encountered rather in the spring.

I mean that the light-green plant in Your photo here: http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v202/chazer/elatinetriandra_zps2353671e.png
isn't Elatine triandra but a Callitriche species. It looks like the plants from the Callitriche palustris species group frequently growing in streams in Europe:
http://www.aquatic-plants.dk/slides/nimdrup/slides/p_0009.jpg
http://www.aquatic-plants.dk/slides/nimdrup/nimdrup.html
 

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It's fairly common across the northern and western U.S. and Canada too. It's a very neat plant, and quite easy to grow from my experience. I grew it outdoors though - haven't tried growing it in an aquarium.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
wow had no idea it was so common, but I assume that It's safe to say that it hasn't made it's way into the hobby due to the requirement of colder temperatures? I have tried growing it in a tank in typical room temperatures, and it did not last very long :p
 

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Cold water is an absolute requirement. Water temperature influences co2 uptake; when things get too hot, they can't use it, no matter how much there is. It's why so many northern plants do so poorly in aquaria.
 
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