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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've kept fish only aquariums most of my life and I'm finally branching into the planted scene I'm using a 16inch cube tank I was given recently its only 15-16 gallons
I was also given a 150w metal halide I know there are plant bulbs out there for halides in the 5500k to 10000k spectrum
Is that going to be to much light for my plants?
Regards Lewis
 

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Yes, this is too much. Watt per gallon (WPG) is not a very good standard because it depends on a lot factors, but for a rough estimate, plants can't use more than 6 WPG. You have about 10 WPG. 2 WPG is about enough to grow almost any plant, going higher, you'll need CO2 and a lot of fertilizer. To start with a planted tank (and not turning it in an algae tank in 1-2 months) think about a max of 1.5-2 WPG for that tank. 1 WPG is even easier but you can't pick the demanding plants (a good way to start I guess).
Good luck and when having any further questions, don't hesitate to ask!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I did think it would be to much and I appreciate the help but I have another question if u are able o answer it
My brother runs a hydroponic store and has led fixtures mixing blue and red LEDs giving the perfect spectrum for plant growth as I can get them cheap is it worth trying them? Or should I just go for a tmc aquaray 400?
 

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It is definitely worth trying the LEDs, espcially since the ones you get will be inexpensive, and designed specifically for plant growth. This is the problem most of us have when considering LEDs--we don't know if a particular model will grow plants well, and the aquarium brands are all too expensive for most of us to experiment with.

One problem you might have is the light from the hydroponic LEDs being an unattractive color. Aquarium lighting is a balance between what works for plants and what looks good to our eyes. I suspect the hydroponic lights are not designed with aesthetics in mind.

If you do this, please let us know how it turns out! I'll bet your brother also has a PAR meter you could borrow--that would be very useful information for the hobby.
 
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