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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It doesn't grow too well for me. My plants only have two or three leaves at any one time. As new leaves grow, the old ones die. I wonder if it is not very well adapted to submersed growth.

Kasselmann writes about C. spiralis existing in many varieties, most of which do poorly underwater. There is one known variety from India that does well and multiplies underwater. I wonder if C. ciliata is like that, too.

Is anybody else having better submersed growth with this plant?
 

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I've tried it and it's not the best for me either. From what I gather its much more of a tidal, even brackish, plant and wonder if it needs some salt to do well submersed. I've had some monster emersed plants in the past though.
 

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Thanks for the picture, Sir_BlackhOle. Your plants look like they are more shaded like mine. but they look basically the same---one leaf bent back and dying, one leaf fully grown and healthy, and one leaf being produced, tightly rolled up.

Next summer, I will have to get one of my two plants outdoors
 

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I just got the go ahead to start my next project....an outdoor pond! Cilatia sounds like a good choice to put in the pond. Anyone have any pics of emmersed Cilatia "mother" plants?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Kasselmann has a picture of C. ciliata growing along a small stream in full sun. It looks like mowed grass along most of the creek with only an occasional palm tree for shade. The leaves of the ciliata look about 12 to 15 inches high.

There are also one or two pictures of emersed C. ciliata by entering Cryptocoryne ciliata in Google and selecting images.
 

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HeyPK said:
It doesn't grow too well for me. My plants only have two or three leaves at any one time. As new leaves grow, the old ones die. I wonder if it is not very well adapted to submersed growth.

Kasselmann writes about C. spiralis existing in many varieties, most of which do poorly underwater. There is one known variety from India that does well and multiplies underwater. I wonder if C. ciliata is like that, too.

Is anybody else having better submersed growth with this plant?
I have exactly the same result as you with C. ciliata.

C. spiralis, on the other hand, is like a gonzo weed.
 
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