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Thank you for the pic. In the link you provided I got the description but for some reason it wouldn鈥檛 provide the pic.I am not real techy but even my search wouldn鈥檛 bring it up. Thanks again for your help. 馃榾
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
I don't see why it wouldn't work. 95% odds that it will work fine; 5% that it will not...

The main ingredient is KCl and I assume the minor ingredients like sugar would be present in only small amounts. None of them should cause a problem, chemically speaking.
 

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Thanks for your input Ms.Walstad.I bought your book a couple of years ago and am now into week 1 of the dry start. Your book is a treasure trove of information. I might just return this salt sub and purchase the item Gadgetgirl mentioned. Thanks again ladies for your help. 馃榾
 

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For correcting softwater deficiencies in tanks already set up, my recipe (using CaCl2, MgSO4, KCl chemicals) does not add bicarbonates. This may be a deficiency. If your KH is 3 or below after the Ca, Mg, and K additions, I would consider adding a little BS (baking soda). To increase KH by one degree, I see recommendations to add 录 tsp BS to 13 gal or 1 gram BS to 10 gal. Sounds about right and dosage is flexible.
 

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I鈥檒l be moving in March 2021 to a home just outside of town with well water and hopefully the water isn鈥檛 too soft. Great info on raising water hardness the right way. Thanks DWalstad and everyone for the great input and resources. I鈥檒l let you know.
 

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To raise ph in a fish tank water using baking soda is one of the most effective ways. It is easy to do, economical, and cheap, does not need expertise, not that meticulous. Compared to other methods of raising ph in my fish tank, the use of baking soda is one of the cheapest and easiest for fish-keeping advocates.
 

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I would add that bicarbonates are not just a pH buffer. They are a carbon source for many submerged aquatic plants, especially those native to hardwaters and can use bicarbonates. One aquatic botanist (Craig S. Smith, 1993) showed two-fold faster growth of two aquatic plant species when bicarbonates were added to a nutrient solution.
 
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