Aquatic Plant Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am a little concerned about my crypts. I have never kept them before, but this forum got me hooked. The crypts I have right now are the "American" C. becketti that Paul (HeyPK) and I collected on the San Marcos River. I think they are going to make it but I am not 100% sure.

I collected a whole bunch thinking that I could populate a biotope and show it growing along side wild rice as a simulation of how the becketti reacts to the endangered Texas wild rice in the San Marcos River. I had a soil substrate in the tank and I think because of the rice started to decompose I got a lot of brown algae in the tank. The becketti leaves began melting, and when I checked the roots they were putrefying. I pulled them all out cleaning up the rooted parts and put them in a 20 g tank with Schultz aquatic plant soil. I have been dosing per T. Barr. The surviving leaves are now melting. Fearing that I was losing the rhizomes, I pulled two plants up today after a week in the 20 g tank. I found that they were producing fine roots and the soil nuggets were fused to the new fine roots only. I take this as a positive sign. I know this stuff is made of Fullers Earth that has a very high CEC. I figure the roots were binding to the gravel to help break down the fertilizers into usable nutrients. Is this so? So I am hoping that this indicates that I will not lose the plants.

I tried growing them emersed in the mini greenhouse both in soil and in gravel, and all these plants died. I do have a few plants in 3 liter bottles with soil and water, and they seem to be hanging on.

If I can get these to grow we can share them, hopefully.

Steve Pituch
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,710 Posts
All the becketti I have is taking off. I have some growing in the substrate of my 75, and some floating that is producing new leaves. The ones I put in soda bottles are taking off as well. I would bet that moving them around has something to do with the melting but I dont know. All mine have been where I put them since I got them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Hi Kevin,

I am learning to be patient. Never before in the hobby did I need this virtue, but crypts are humbling.

1) In the 20 gallon with the Schultz soil, I think most of the crypts (about 40 of them) are holding on. I am not touching them except to cut off the rotted leaves once a week. I don't see much growth on them, but I believe they are working on roots right now.

2) I had some crypts in water in a 3 liter bottle. Most of them rotted.

3) I have 4 crypts each in two 3 liter bottles with soil and water up to the soil. They've been in there a month and are growing very slowly, but they look fine. I haven't added anything to these bottles since I set them up.

4) I have about 5 crypts in the 75 gal tank, probably like yours. They are growing slowly.

5) I had some crypts in pots with soil and also pots with gravel in my outside little greenhouse. They all quickly shriveled up and died.

6) I forgot about this one. In my cement mixing plastic tub where I am growing rice outside I must have thrown in about five crypt roots. I stopped using the filter for circulation last week. Yesterday, I put a hose in the tub and ran the water until the water in the tub was clear. I found 5 crypt roots with small leaves on them floating in the tub. I put half of them in the 20 gal tank and half in the 75.

Gradually when I get some of the plants to the point where I am proud of their condition, I will start mailing them out.

Regards,
Steve Pituch
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
crypts will rot in the initial phase of transplanting. They will shed their old leaves and grow new ones. Refrain from moving the crypts too much as they are not susceptible to too much changes. Also they are heavy root feeders and they need higher content in iron for the substrate.

Cheers
Vincent
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,173 Posts
Steve,

It sounds like you're doing the right thing with your plants. I've found that a mix of Shultz APS, sand and compost based potting soil, peat, and a little powdered dolomite is working well on my fussier plants. I've got some purpurea and gasseri that I've was worried about for few weeks but they've started to recover after the transplant. Oh yeah, all of my plants are currently growing emersed. That may affect things..:)

Best,
Phil
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top